Dispatches From the Field
AAAS 2000 Annual Meeting

Behind the Scenes
A Day in the Life of the Meeting - Feb. 19, 2000

By Rob Semper

The AAAS Annual Meeting is composed of dozens of activities that run from early morning to late evening. There's so much going on that you often want to be in three places at once. Fortunately, the session rooms allow for lots of quick exits and entrances so you can often attend 2 or 3 sessions in the same hour.

The following schedule for one typical day, along with Meeting Glossary links, gives you an idea of what it is like to be here:

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2000

7:00am-8:30am
Business Meetings
Section Officers' Meeting

8:00am-8:45am
Topical Lectures

8:00am-12:00noon
Business Meeting
Committee on Science, Engineering and Public Policy

8:30am-11:00am
Banquet
Breakfast with Scientists

9:00am-12:00noon
Business Meeting
6 Section Business Meetings

9:00am-12:00noon
Scientific Symposia
16 Symposia

9:00am-4:00pm
Business Meeting
Committee on Public Understanding of Science

10:00am-12:00noon
Business Meeting
Affiliates Meeting

10:00am-2:00pm
Banquet
Students and Scientists with Disabilities Luncheon

12:30pm-1:15pm
Topical Lectures

12:30pm-3:30pm
Business Meeting
3 Section Business Meetings

1:00pm-5:00pm
Business Meeting
Science's Next Wave Advisory Board Meeting

1:30pm-2:15pm
Topical Lectures

1:30pm-4:00pm
Special Event
American Junior Academy of Science Presentation

2:00pm-4:00pm
Special Event
NPR's Talk of the Nation-Science Friday Broadcast

2:30pm-5:30pm
Scientific Symposia
15 symposia

4:00pm-6:30pm
Exhibit Hall Opening

5:00pm-6:30pm
Reception
Exhibit Hall Reception

6:30pm-7:30pm
Plenary Lecture

7:30pm-8:30pm
Reception
Dialogue on Science, Ethics and Religion

7:30pm-10:30pm
Business Meetings
8 Section Business Meetings

8:00pm-10:30pm
Special Event
Annals of Improbable Research Presentation

... plus there are Career Workshops and Poster Sessions to visit, too.


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