Andrey Kolmogorov


Kolmogorov was one of the developers of probability theory.

Kolmogorov graduated from Moscow State University in 1925 and then became a professor there in 1931. In 1939 he was elected to the Soviet Academy of Sciences, receiving the Lenin Prize in 1965 and the Order of Lenin on six separate occasions.

His work on probability theory started with a paper in which he built up probability theory in a rigorous way from fundamental axioms, similar to Euclid's treatment of geometry. Kolmogorov later extended his work to study the motion of the planets and the turbulent flow of air from a jet engine, later publishing two papers on turbulence which are even today of fundamental importance.

In 1954 he developed his work on dynamical systems in relation to planetary motion, thus demonstrating the vital role of probability theory in physics.

He had many interests outside mathematics, a notable example being the poetry of the Russian author Pushkin.






Exhibits || Lexicon || Timeline

The Exploratorium, 1996

Andrey Kolmogorov

Andrey Kolmogorov


Kolmogorov was one of the developers of probability theory.

Kolmogorov graduated from Moscow State University in 1925 and then became a professor there in 1931. In 1939 he was elected to the Soviet Academy of Sciences, receiving the Lenin Prize in 1965 and the Order of Lenin on six separate occasions.

His work on probability theory started with a paper in which he built up probability theory in a rigorous way from fundamental axioms, similar to Euclid's treatment of geometry. Kolmogorov later extended his work to study the motion of the planets and the turbulent flow of air from a jet engine, later publishing two papers on turbulence which are even today of fundamental importance.

In 1954 he developed his work on dynamical systems in relation to planetary motion, thus demonstrating the vital role of probability theory in physics.

He had many interests outside mathematics, a notable example being the poetry of the Russian author Pushkin.






Exhibits || Lexicon || Timeline

The Exploratorium, 1996