I had to stay home from school(cause eclipse day fell on a Wednesday). Sadly where I was at in Fayettteville, NC the sky did not clear and at the height of the eclipse. THe sky did darken for a few seconds but it would've been much better if the sky was clear. As the moon pulled away from the sun the sky clear. Leaving a partial eclipse and even though we there in Fayetteville were clouded over, Charlotte and Greensboro (which sat on the eclipse central line) got crystal clear skies and a good viewing . Of course the evening news headlines were peppered with the near total eclipse of the sun that day 1984. Other BIG eclipses that I followed were 1991, 1994, 1998,1999, and 2001 all on TV. Hopefully now that I'm in the army hopefully duty assignment will place me overseas in the path on an upcoming eclipse. Also thank you Johnny Horne back in Fayetteville, NC (a photograher for the Fayetteville Observer) your lunar and solar eclipse photos and other astronomical features helped keep my inspired on the sky shows up above.

Arthur Weems, Jr.
Fort Bliss, Tx United States - Monday, November 12, 2001 at 19:24:49 (PST


it was amazing. i saw this cat shaped head in the sky!

sussana
sydney, australia - Tuesday, October 16, 2001 at 18:45:35 (PDT)


One day I was 13 and a solar eclipse came.we didn't go outside because of the sun.

ashley
nasa, tx usa - Monday, October 15, 2001 at 09:54:55 (PDT)


Great eclipse, clear skies, shadow bands( finally saw them) , beautiful Capetown and Victoria Falls, Safari animals and much more. I have posted my 2001 eclipse account at http://members.aol.com/kcstarguy/blacksun/2001eclipse.htm I have posted (1) the picture I took during of the sun in totality and the the landscape (2) The "ring of fire" panoroma photos (360 degree around during totality) that I stitched toegther from my videotape. Compare this with the one I took 1 minute before totality in Hungary 1999 (3) a simulation image of what was in the sky during totality (made with starry night software) (4) a full account of the eclipse experience (photos and links coming soon) (5) Information about the shadow bands we saw and much more I also made a video of the whole trip and includes the eclipse (6) Links to other 2001 observers (7) links to other eclipse information and much more

Dr.Eric Flescher
Olathe, KS usa - Friday, August 24, 2001 at 08:23:45 (PDT)


In 1979 I had asked for a couple days off from my job at REI in Seattle to hitchhike to Goldendale to watch the eclipse of February 26. But two days before the eclipse, a team of TV newscasters came into the store looking for "climbers." They planned to helicopter to Camp Schurman high on Mt. Rainier do an eyewitness report on the eclipse. The Park Service told them they had to be supported by a team of qualified climbers, and they had come into our shop to find them. I rushed to my supervisor to ask permission, and within the hour, I and the rest of the participants were in a van headed for the takeoff site at Crystal Mountain Ski Area. The following night and day presented terrible conditions, unsuitable for a helicopter takeoff. As evening approached, the members of the TV crew, increasingly nervous, began to confer. Eventually, they announced that they were to depart for Olympia that evening, stay overnight, and in the morning attempt a takeoff from there. There would be room in the copter only for the TV crew. We could come along if we wanted; they promised to send the helicopter back for us if at all possible, but the TV crew's mission came first. I demurred. The chance of the helicopter's making one trip seemed slim enough, and I doubted the TV crew's commitment to us once they were there. The last thing I wanted was to get stuck outside the path of totality in Olympia. I preferred to stay where I was and take my chances with the weather. The other two members of the climbing team saw it differently and accepted the offer. As the others drove off toward warm beds in Olympia, I trudged upward, snow up to my calves and snowflakes falling around me. Sometime around 11:00, I dug out a platform and bivouacked. At daybreak, I packed up and continued glumly under an overcast sky. The advancing partial phases were darkening the clouds as I reached the crest and looked out over distant ridges. There were patches ef light where the fading sun shone through holes in the cloud cover. How I wished I was standing in one of them. I stood watching the scene, my last hopes fading. Suddenly I saw a sunny patch at the base the next ridge. There was the silhouette of the ridge I was standing on. I looked to my right. There, not more than 200 meters away, was sunlit snow. I don't know how I did it, but I ran with a pack through calf-deep snow along the broad crest. After a couple of minutes it became evident that I didn't need to run, that the sky was opening up all around me. The crescent sun was down almost to nothing. Something strange passed across the snow, and I looked down. Shadow bands! Totality was brief; against the corona I could track the glow of the barely eclipsed sun from diamond ring to diamond ring. Then the shadow bands on the snow again, marching in the opposite direction at about the speed of a walk. It was a magnificent sight. Back home, I learned that the helicopter never made it off the ground. Well, my mother always said I was stubborn.

Doug Rice
Pendleton, OR USA - Sunday, August 19, 2001 at 15:05:30 (PDT)


Just before totality, the ?shadow bands? are my most puzzling experience, as they are announcing right on the ground and around me the imminence of that undescribable sight of a total solar eclipse !

jean charles duvernois
paris, france - Friday, August 03, 2001 at 06:48:42 (PDT)


I travelled to Cornwall in England hoping to see the last total solar eclipse of the millennium on August 11, 1999. Sadly this total eclipse was all but totally eclipsed by heavy clouds that moved in overnight and obscured the view. I was only able to see some of the partial phase through the clouds following totality. I thus missed out on seeing and hopefully photographing the "Eye of God" that appears at totality. "Eye of God"? Well, yes, as a matter of fact the totally eclipsed sun does distinctly resemble the pupil and iris of an eye staring down from the sky. The black "hole in the sky" formed by the occulting moon mimics the pupil of an eye while the rays and streamers of the sun's corona shining out around the black moon resemble the muscle structure of the iris. For more information about how this "Eye of God" and other visual phenomena manifested during solar and lunar eclipses profoundly influenced the religious beliefs and "mythology" of ancient humanity see my "Web Sights" linked from Treasures of Darkness at http://treasuresofdarkness.homestead.com Sometimes a distinctly bird-like pattern is manifested in the sun's corona. This inspired the winged sun disk symbol of ancient Egypt, their solar falcon god Horus and their bennu bird which in turn inspired the proverbial phoenix myth. Eclipses have had a far greater influence on humanity's religious beliefs than most people realize... By the way what are the odds that our sun and moon would have virtually identical apparent sizes when viewed from the Earth, thus allowing total solar eclipses to occur, or that the totally eclipsed sun would bear a striking similarity in appearance to an "Eye of God"?

Robin Edgar
Verdun, QC Canada - Saturday, July 28, 2001 at 10:06:59 (PDT)


shooting star wish came true

Kady Rotondo
Pawling, N.Y. U.S.A. - Monday, July 23, 2001 at 13:45:51 (PDT)


I watch people during solar eclipses. I have repeatedly noticed a momentary drop in a person's energy level. A kind of tired, lapsed look followed by a recovery phase as if nothing ever happened.

Carrie Lever, Therapist/Astrologer
Blue Bell, PA USA - Wednesday, June 27, 2001 at 12:49:57 (PDT)


In 1994 there was an annular eclipse here in the midwestor February), but when we arrived at Helena the night before the eclipse, conditions were unremittingly cloudy. All indications were that the next morning would be the same. With totality beginning at around 10 a.m., some of the gathered observers in town elected to travel off in various directions, hoping to catch a break in the clouds. My friends and I elected to stay put.

Sure enough, as we drove to our selected viewing station (on a hill south of town), cloudy conditions prevailed. We set up our gear, turned on the radio, and waited.

As I recall, once the partial eclipse began, the sun was visible as a white disk through the thinning clouds. A strange, dusky light descended over the town, and the usual hubbub of traffic and urban buzz came to a halt. As the disk of the sun (as observed on the white card we'd set up at the refractor's focal point) became a small crescent, a gap in the clouds appeared off to the east, and seemed to be approaching the sun's position. Everyone on the hillside held their breath.

As if by divine design, the clear sky area crept across the solar disk; by the time darkness fell across the town down below, the sky around the sun was clear. Street lights came on in downtown Helena; there was a collective sigh, and perhaps a few cheers, as the thrill of the event settled in. We snapped images furiously and tried to soak up the experience as best we could.

I will never forget it. - JM

John P. Meyer
Dallas, TX USA - Sunday, June 03, 2001 at 08:15:10 (PDT)


Hai!! nice knowing this page. I am not a scientist. But I am proud of myself of being given a chance to the total ecslipe.

I was born in rural place, somewhere in Sabah, malaysia. My village's name is matunggong. To those who ever seen a total ecslipe over Malaysia in 1996, you must know where Matunggong located is.

I was just a teenager, that year.Every body did not want to skip a chance to see the event. Some said, it was an end of the word. It was a wonderful experience for me.

shnae
Kota Kinabalu, Sabah Malaysia - Friday, May 25, 2001 at 03:54:52 (PDT)


Working in the broadcast industry for many years has alerted me to the fact that more than 25 solar eclipses occur twice a year at the solstice periods and not many people are aware of them at all! While many radio and television managers refer to them simply as "sunspots", in reality they are astronomically geometric relations between the sun, the earth and a geocentrically placed communication satellite. Also known as "sunfades" they cause havoc for a few hours at the peak times and spectral analysis of the phenomena is as exciting as watching a traditional eclipse with the eye. Although DSL viewers can't detect the event due to the design of the DSL using three adjacent satellites, the event is as real as can be. Such events are excellent Science Fair projects. Contact your local television or radio engineer for more info. It will be an interesting walk on the other side of the eclipse!

Anthony Garza
Lubbock, TX USA - Thursday, May 24, 2001 at 06:57:29 (PDT)


I was sarrounded by trees, and the eclipse started. I was in total darkness

matt linnen
- Thursday, May 24, 2001 at 04:05:39 (PDT)


I have submitted a URL for a site which will show how amateur can get coronal temperature profiles from their solar eclipse photographes or images: http://www.igpp.ucla.edu/jweygand/htmls/eclipse.dir/eclipse.paper.html

james weygand
LA, CA USA - Monday, May 21, 2001 at 13:33:52 (PDT)


Oh my solar eclipes r so kool 1 But i have never seen one i wish i could but i cant ! I have a problem its just that i am always not home to see one because i am always out wit my friends and boyfriend !! help me please !

Tiffany Sexton
Valrico, FL UNITED STATES - Thursday, May 10, 2001 at 15:54:51 (PDT)


The thing that got me was the chickens running to the chicken house.One of my chickens were laying an egg.

susan dunbar
marion, IL U.S.A. - Thursday, May 10, 2001 at 07:13:32 (PDT)


We drove to La Paz in 1991 for the total eclipse. Scientists and their equipment filled the area. Many were kind enough to allow my family to view the eclipse through their equipment. The eclipse itself was awe-inspiring; cooling of the air, birds flying in to roost, the party atmosphere. Truly a once in a lifetime experience.

Doug Swords
Sanger, ca usa - Friday, May 15, 1998 at 13:13:16 (PDT)


Hello! Thank you for this opportunity to read so interesting impressions about a total solar eclipse. I have not a story because I have never seen such a phenomenon. I am working in Astronomical Institute of Roumanian Academy and my field of interest is solar and solar-terrestrial physics. Actually I am head of the Solar Department. All of us are very interested in solar eclipses because in Romania it will be the "maximum of total eclipse of August 1999" (the greatest eclipse!). We invite you to Romania to see the last eclipse of the millenium! Please, visite our site: http://www.roastro.astro.ro

Georgeta Maris
Bucharest, RO ROMANIA - Friday, April 24, 1998 at 00:27:19 (PDT)


I saw it from Maracaibo-Venezuela at the Planetarium's Parking Lot. The magic moment to me, was the sudden change of speed that make the sun's movement just before totality. Everything was in a kind of softly rythm, but in a second the sun literaly jump and hide.

Antonio Noguera
Caracas, Venezuela - Friday, April 17, 1998 at 00:11:28 (PDT)


I saw it from Maracaibo-Venezuela at the Planetarium's Parking Lot. The magic moment to me, was the sudden change of speed tha make the sun's movement just before get full back of the moon. Everything was in a kind of softly rythm, but in a second the sun literaly jump and hide.

Antonio Noguera
Caracas, Venezuela - Friday, April 17, 1998 at 00:09:53 (PDT)


Your site is terrific, I am thoroughly enjoying it, and I am looking forward to many rewarding hours perusing it. I have, at this time, no story to share, but, I would be in your debt if someone would be kind enough to answer a question I have. Would someone be able to tell me what constellations were visible in the night sky of Aruba, the nights of February 23, 24, 25, 1998? This information would greatly help me to enhance a project I am presently working on. Thank you, whoever steps forward, for your help. Steve.

Steven LeClair
Montreal, Canada - Wednesday, April 15, 1998 at 05:41:13 (PDT)


This was my second, the 1st being in 1991. Both times I have selected a cruise for the exhibition, and they have both been successful. While it took some manuevering, the Veendam did make it to an excellent viewing position. As for this eclipse, I did particularly admire the planets that were visible and a beautiful corona, although everything else, such as the diamond ring was wonderful, too. The only thing is that I thought it might be darker. In any case, it was simply spectacular, and I can't wait to do it again either in 1999 or 2001.

Mike Marcelletti
Bloomingdale, MI 49026 - Sunday, April 12, 1998 at 15:49:28 (PDT)


On July 11, 1991, Garth O'Donnell and I went deep sea fishing off Kaneohe Bay on the north shore of Oahu, Hawaii. With winds at 15 to 20 knots it was a brisk morning on a 19'6" center console. It was a cloudy day and most of the people in Hawaii missed the eclipse. Because we were out several miles from the island the cloud cover was less dense and though the eclipse was not total we were able to watch it without filter as the clouds were acting as the perfect filter. The most amazing thing was the sea birds, some returning home and others just sitting on the water totally confused by the bizarre early morning sunset. We did later fullfil our mission with a good size "Ono" (known as a Wahoo to many). It was a memorable experience.

Kelly Faulkner
Kaneohe, HI US - Friday, March 27, 1998 at 00:48:47 (PST)


My wife and I love Total Eclipses. We went to Aruba to see this one. Everyone said in Aruba you don't need to worry about the weathaid, at least ONCE in my life I am determined to see a total solar eclipse. The fact that this one was in Aruba (in February) made it a rather easy sell, with no objections from the rest of the clan. I knew how awe inspiring it would be and tried my best to get them to understand the significance of the event, although I don't think they completely believed me. Well, we came, we saw, we conquered, and everyone in my family agreed that it was FANTASTIC. I am so glad we made the trip, and now I've made converts out of the wife and kids - they are very glad we went also. I was particularly struck by the sight of the birds flying back to their nests, and the indescribable color of the sky during totallity. Although I took lots of pictures (some of which turned out rather good) and saw replays of it on CNN, no pictures or video can even come close to the stunning beauty of the actual event. To those who have seen one, you understand what I say. To those of you who haven't, take my advice and do whatever it takes to go see one. I guarantee you will not be disappointed.

Jack Schenck
DE USA - Wednesday, March 04, 1998 at 22:03:54 (PST)


I observed the most impressive and overwhelming experience in my life in Maracaibo, Venezuela last 26 february. I was in the capital city, Caracas the day before and still had doubts regarding if a solar eclipse is worth traveling to see. I finally encouraged myself and took the first plane to Maracaibo. The most amazing thing to me is the weird feeling of quietness that comes to the enviroment just a few seconds before totality then like a dream you see the sunlight being eaten by the moon and a rare darkness devour everything. Definitely, this is the most beautiful thing thaty you can ever witness in your life. If you can travel to see the next total eclipse, go ! you'll never regret it.

Javier Rondon
Venezuela - Wednesday, March 04, 1998 at 09:55:32 (PST)


I observed my first eclipse from the island of Taboga off the coast of Panama. This area was in 95% of totality. Even though Feb. is the driest month of the year, the clouds wanted to get all the attention. The day was very cloudy which forced us to look at the sky without the mylar lenses we had purchased for this event. We saw a phenomena which I had not heard of or read about before. The sunlight there was reflected off the edges of several clouds making it seems as though there were several 'suns' in the sky. In fact all of these 'suns' were brighter than the eclipsed sun. I would like others to let me know if they also experienced this. The sky darkened as though a storm was approaching. The beeze turned a few degrees cooler and we did see a few birds come is as if to roost. All of these were expected effects of the eclipse. We used a camera with a zoom lense and filters to take pictures at 15 min intervals (and cloud permitting). I was naive enough not to understand the difference between 95% and 100%. Trust me, I will not make that mistake again. Next time (2018?) I will bring the family, make sure I can be within the area of 100%, and I will be more aware of the weather.

Jerima King
Colorado Springs, CO USA - Tuesday, March 03, 1998 at 13:54:20 (PST)


I had seen pictures. I thought I knew what to expect. I was totally floored as I watched the total eclipse in Aruba 2/26/98. We set up just outside the Queen Beatrix Airport. When totality began, you could hear cheering and honking horns all over the island.

Jen Marrs
Framingham, MA USA - Monday, March 02, 1998 at 11:43:29 (PST)


I viewed the eclipse from the University of the Virgin Islands on the St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands campus. It was 90% near totality. Next to my kids, it was the most beautiful thing I've ever experienced.

Johann Creque
St. Thomas, VI US - Monday, March 02, 1998 at 10:53:09 (PST)


Just returned from Aruba. Had a magnificent eclipse experience. This is eclipse number five for me. Started my addiction on February 26, 1979 in Saskatchewan, Canada. Other eclipses viewed were in Mazatlan, Mexico (1991); Potosi, Bolivia 1994; Darkhan, Mongolia 1997. The 1998 Carribean eclipse ranks as my number two eclipse experience but only because the first good one is always the best. I took my entire family with me this time (wife and three sons 14,12,10) we watched from atop the highest point on the island of Aruba at a peak called Yamanota. We could see the entire island from our vantage point. Others will report that the unsettled weather gave them cause for concern and that is also what happened with us. The difference, however, is that we could see the weather coming in off the ocean and for us it was a matter of determining how long it would take to reach us and, when it did, how long it would take to blow over us. We got rain (the first in five months on the island) we got heavy cloud and we got that sinking feeling that this one would not be ours to see but about 15 minutes before totality, the skies cleared and stayed that way. During totality, we could see people setting off fireworks all over the island. The runway lights came on at the airport and, at the prison on the island all of the bright sodium lights came on - a poignant reminder for the incarcerated that even in the path of totality, crime has unexpected costs. The best thing about an eclipse for me is being with people who have never actually experienced one before. It's one thing to have seen a movie or videotape of an eclipse or have read up on them but quite another to experience it. Some people, like the very sombre and reserved Swiss computer programmer I met while scouting viewing locations was still emotionally and physically overwhemed by the experience three days after the event. He told me that just shutting his eyes and remembering what happened was enough to make him extremely emotional. We were blessed with clear skies and a marvellous eclipse, saw both diamond rings but this time no 360 degree sunset. It appeared to be absorbed by ocean cloud banks. Many people viewed the eclipse from the beach or at their hotels. We made it an expedition. So much of our experiences these days are mediated through television and special effects we thought it important that our kids clearly understood that this was not just something that you get up from your lawn chair and your drink to witness it before returning to whatever you were doing.

Don Fleming
Edmonton, Ab Canada - Sunday, March 01, 1998 at 20:56:59 (PST)


Last Thursday was my first experience of totality. I was about 600 yards north of Baby Beach on the south-east corner of Aruba. The most remarkable thing was when third contact occured. It was as if someone had struck an arc, and everything was shimmering for a moment.

Paul Hunsberger
Mason, OH USA - Sunday, March 01, 1998 at 19:37:20 (PST)


I was on Palm Beach in Aruba on the 26th. The two things that really struck me were how sharp shadows became in the last few minutes before and after totality. I also saw shadow bands on a white sheet I had laid out. They were faint at first, but came very prominent just prior to the diamond ring.

Jeff Wilson
Madison, WI USA - Sunday, March 01, 1998 at 18:52:18 (PST)


We were fortunate enough to be on a cruise in the carribean aboard the Monarch of the Seas and the day planned to be in the exact location for totality. The captian of the ship along with Charles Perry posistioned the ship as such and we experienced one of the most awesome sights on earth. The top deck of the ship grew almost silent as planets and stars appeared. It was incredible!! Our ship was posistioned between Guadalupe and Monserrat and if the total eclipse was not enough the active volcano on Monserrat decided to add a little more flavour by having a minor erruption spewing a cloud of smoke. The cheers on the ship when we hit totality is certainly an experience my wife and I will never forget

John Andrews
Old Orchard Beach, me usa - Sunday, March 01, 1998 at 17:39:38 (PST)


It was an unforgettable experience,the light turn down like a dimmer I had to stay home from school(cause eclipse day fell on a Wednesday). Sadly where I was at in Fayettteville, NC the sky did not clear and at the height of the eclipse. THe sky did darken for a few seconds but it would've been much better if the sky was clear. As the moon pulled away from the sun the sky clear. Leaving a partial eclipse and even though we there in Fayetteville were clouded over, Charlotte and Greensboro (which sat on the eclipse central line) got crystal clear skies and a good viewing . Of course the evening news headlines were peppered with the near total eclipse of the sun that day 1984. Other BIG eclipses that I followed were 1991, 1994, 1998,1999, and 2001 all on TV. Hopefully now that I'm in the army hopefully duty assignment will place me overseas in the path on an upcoming eclipse. Also thank you Johnny Horne back in Fayetteville, NC (a photograher for the Fayetteville Observer) your lunar and solar eclipse photos and other astronomical features helped keep my inspired on the sky shows up above.

Arthur Weems, Jr.
Fort Bliss, Tx United States - Monday, November 12, 2001 at 19:24:49 (PST


it was amazing. i saw this cat shaped head in the sky!

sussana
sydney, australia - Tuesday, October 16, 2001 at 18:45:35 (PDT)


One day I was 13 and a solar eclipse came.we didn't go outside because of the sun.

ashley
nasa, tx usa - Monday, October 15, 2001 at 09:54:55 (PDT)


Great eclipse, clear skies, shadow bands( finally saw them) , beautiful Capetown and Victoria Falls, Safari animals and much more. I have posted my 2001 eclipse account at http://members.aol.com/kcstarguy/blacksun/2001eclipse.htm I have posted (1) the picture I took during of the sun in totality and the the landscape (2) The "ring of fire" panoroma photos (360 degree around during totality) that I stitched toegther from my videotape. Compare this with the one I took 1 minute before totality in Hungary 1999 (3) a simulation image of what was in the sky during totality (made with starry night software) (4) a full account of the eclipse experience (photos and links coming soon) (5) Information about the shadow bands we saw and much more I also made a video of the whole trip and includes the eclipse (6) Links to other 2001 observers (7) links to other eclipse information and much more

Dr.Eric Flescher
Olathe, KS usa - Friday, August 24, 2001 at 08:23:45 (PDT)


In 1979 I had asked for a couple days off from my job at REI in Seattle to hitchhike to Goldendale to watch the eclipse of February 26. But two days before the eclipse, a team of TV newscasters came into the store looking for "climbers." They planned to helicopter to Camp Schurman high on Mt. Rainier do an eyewitness report on the eclipse. The Park Service told them they had to be supported by a team of qualified climbers, and they had come into our shop to find them. I rushed to my supervisor to ask permission, and within the hour, I and the rest of the participants were in a van headed for the takeoff site at Crystal Mountain Ski Area. The following night and day presented terrible conditions, unsuitable for a helicopter takeoff. As evening approached, the members of the TV crew, increasingly nervous, began to confer. Eventually, they announced that they were to depart for Olympia that evening, stay overnight, and in the morning attempt a takeoff from there. There would be room in the copter only for the TV crew. We could come along if we wanted; they promised to send the helicopter back for us if at all possible, but the TV crew's mission came first. I demurred. The chance of the helicopter's making one trip seemed slim enough, and I doubted the TV crew's commitment to us once they were there. The last thing I wanted was to get stuck outside the path of totality in Olympia. I preferred to stay where I was and take my chances with the weather. The other two members of the climbing team saw it differently and accepted the offer. As the others drove off toward warm beds in Olympia, I trudged upward, snow up to my calves and snowflakes falling around me. Sometime around 11:00, I dug out a platform and bivouacked. At daybreak, I packed up and continued glumly under an overcast sky. The advancing partial phases were darkening the clouds as I reached the crest and looked out over distant ridges. There were patches ef light where the fading sun shone through holes in the cloud cover. How I wished I was standing in one of them. I stood watching the scene, my last hopes fading. Suddenly I saw a sunny patch at the base the next ridge. There was the silhouette of the ridge I was standing on. I looked to my right. There, not more than 200 meters away, was sunlit snow. I don't know how I did it, but I ran with a pack through calf-deep snow along the broad crest. After a couple of minutes it became evident that I didn't need to run, that the sky was opening up all around me. The crescent sun was down almost to nothing. Something strange passed across the snow, and I looked down. Shadow bands! Totality was brief; against the corona I could track the glow of the barely eclipsed sun from diamond ring to diamond ring. Then the shadow bands on the snow again, marching in the opposite direction at about the speed of a walk. It was a magnificent sight. Back home, I learned that the helicopter never made it off the ground. Well, my mother always said I was stubborn.

Doug Rice
Pendleton, OR USA - Sunday, August 19, 2001 at 15:05:30 (PDT)


Just before totality, the ?shadow bands? are my most puzzling experience, as they are announcing right on the ground and around me the imminence of that undescribable sight of a total solar eclipse !

jean charles duvernois
paris, france - Friday, August 03, 2001 at 06:48:42 (PDT)


I travelled to Cornwall in England hoping to see the last total solar eclipse of the millennium on August 11, 1999. Sadly this total eclipse was all but totally eclipsed by heavy clouds that moved in overnight and obscured the view. I was only able to see some of the partial phase through the clouds following totality. I thus missed out on seeing and hopefully photographing the "Eye of God" that appears at totality. "Eye of God"? Well, yes, as a matter of fact the totally eclipsed sun does distinctly resemble the pupil and iris of an eye staring down from the sky. The black "hole in the sky" formed by the occulting moon mimics the pupil of an eye while the rays and streamers of the sun's corona shining out around the black moon resemble the muscle structure of the iris. For more information about how this "Eye of God" and other visual phenomena manifested during solar and lunar eclipses profoundly influenced the religious beliefs and "mythology" of ancient humanity see my "Web Sights" linked from Treasures of Darkness at http://treasuresofdarkness.homestead.com Sometimes a distinctly bird-like pattern is manifested in the sun's corona. This inspired the winged sun disk symbol of ancient Egypt, their solar falcon god Horus and their bennu bird which in turn inspired the proverbial phoenix myth. Eclipses have had a far greater influence on humanity's religious beliefs than most people realize... By the way what are the odds that our sun and moon would have virtually identical apparent sizes when viewed from the Earth, thus allowing total solar eclipses to occur, or that the totally eclipsed sun would bear a striking similarity in appearance to an "Eye of God"?

Robin Edgar
Verdun, QC Canada - Saturday, July 28, 2001 at 10:06:59 (PDT)


shooting star wish came true

Kady Rotondo
Pawling, N.Y. U.S.A. - Monday, July 23, 2001 at 13:45:51 (PDT)


I watch people during solar eclipses. I have repeatedly noticed a momentary drop in a person's energy level. A kind of tired, lapsed look followed by a recovery phase as if nothing ever happened.

Carrie Lever, Therapist/Astrologer
Blue Bell, PA USA - Wednesday, June 27, 2001 at 12:49:57 (PDT)


In 1994 there was an annular eclipse here in the midwestor February), but when we arrived at Helena the night before the eclipse, conditions were unremittingly cloudy. All indications were that the next morning would be the same. With totality beginning at around 10 a.m., some of the gathered observers in town elected to travel off in various directions, hoping to catch a break in the clouds. My friends and I elected to stay put.

Sure enough, as we drove to our selected viewing station (on a hill south of town), cloudy conditions prevailed. We set up our gear, turned on the radio, and waited.

As I recall, once the partial eclipse began, the sun was visible as a white disk through the thinning clouds. A strange, dusky light descended over the town, and the usual hubbub of traffic and urban buzz came to a halt. As the disk of the sun (as observed on the white card we'd set up at the refractor's focal point) became a small crescent, a gap in the clouds appeared off to the east, and seemed to be approaching the sun's position. Everyone on the hillside held their breath.

As if by divine design, the clear sky area crept across the solar disk; by the time darkness fell across the town down below, the sky around the sun was clear. Street lights came on in downtown Helena; there was a collective sigh, and perhaps a few cheers, as the thrill of the event settled in. We snapped images furiously and tried to soak up the experience as best we could.

I will never forget it. - JM

John P. Meyer
Dallas, TX USA - Sunday, June 03, 2001 at 08:15:10 (PDT)


Hai!! nice knowing this page. I am not a scientist. But I am proud of myself of being given a chance to the total ecslipe.

I was born in rural place, somewhere in Sabah, malaysia. My village's name is matunggong. To those who ever seen a total ecslipe over Malaysia in 1996, you must know where Matunggong located is.

I was just a teenager, that year.Every body did not want to skip a chance to see the event. Some said, it was an end of the word. It was a wonderful experience for me.

shnae
Kota Kinabalu, Sabah Malaysia - Friday, May 25, 2001 at 03:54:52 (PDT)


Working in the broadcast industry for many years has alerted me to the fact that more than 25 solar eclipses occur twice a year at the solstice periods and not many people are aware of them at all! While many radio and television managers refer to them simply as "sunspots", in reality they are astronomically geometric relations between the sun, the earth and a geocentrically placed communication satellite. Also known as "sunfades" they cause havoc for a few hours at the peak times and spectral analysis of the phenomena is as exciting as watching a traditional eclipse with the eye. Although DSL viewers can't detect the event due to the design of the DSL using three adjacent satellites, the event is as real as can be. Such events are excellent Science Fair projects. Contact your local television or radio engineer for more info. It will be an interesting walk on the other side of the eclipse!

Anthony Garza
Lubbock, TX USA - Thursday, May 24, 2001 at 06:57:29 (PDT)


I was sarrounded by trees, and the eclipse started. I was in total darkness

matt linnen
- Thursday, May 24, 2001 at 04:05:39 (PDT)


I have submitted a URL for a site which will show how amateur can get coronal temperature profiles from their solar eclipse photographes or images: http://www.igpp.ucla.edu/jweygand/htmls/eclipse.dir/eclipse.paper.html

james weygand
LA, CA USA - Monday, May 21, 2001 at 13:33:52 (PDT)


Oh my solar eclipes r so kool 1 But i have never seen one i wish i could but i cant ! I have a problem its just that i am always not home to see one because i am always out wit my friends and boyfriend !! help me please !

Tiffany Sexton
Valrico, FL UNITED STATES - Thursday, May 10, 2001 at 15:54:51 (PDT)


The thing that got me was the chickens running to the chicken house.One of my chickens were laying an egg.

susan dunbar
marion, IL U.S.A. - Thursday, May 10, 2001 at 07:13:32 (PDT)


We drove to La Paz in 1991 for the total eclipse. Scientists and their equipment filled the area. Many were kind enough to allow my family to view the eclipse through their equipment. The eclipse itself was awe-inspiring; cooling of the air, birds flying in to roost, the party atmosphere. Truly a once in a lifetime experience.

Doug Swords
Sanger, ca usa - Friday, May 15, 1998 at 13:13:16 (PDT)


Hello! Thank you for this opportunity to read so interesting impressions about a total solar eclipse. I have not a story because I have never seen such a phenomenon. I am working in Astronomical Institute of Roumanian Academy and my field of interest is solar and solar-terrestrial physics. Actually I am head of the Solar Department. All of us are very interested in solar eclipses because in Romania it will be the "maximum of total eclipse of August 1999" (the greatest eclipse!). We invite you to Romania to see the last eclipse of the millenium! Please, visite our site: http://www.roastro.astro.ro

Georgeta Maris
Bucharest, RO ROMANIA - Friday, April 24, 1998 at 00:27:19 (PDT)


I saw it from Maracaibo-Venezuela at the Planetarium's Parking Lot. The magic moment to me, was the sudden change of speed that make the sun's movement just before totality. Everything was in a kind of softly rythm, but in a second the sun literaly jump and hide.

Antonio Noguera
Caracas, Venezuela - Friday, April 17, 1998 at 00:11:28 (PDT)


I saw it from Maracaibo-Venezuela at the Planetarium's Parking Lot. The magic moment to me, was the sudden change of speed tha make the sun's movement just before get full back of the moon. Everything was in a kind of softly rythm, but in a second the sun literaly jump and hide.

Antonio Noguera
Caracas, Venezuela - Friday, April 17, 1998 at 00:09:53 (PDT)


Your site is terrific, I am thoroughly enjoying it, and I am looking forward to many rewarding hours perusing it. I have, at this time, no story to share, but, I would be in your debt if someone would be kind enough to answer a question I have. Would someone be able to tell me what constellations were visible in the night sky of Aruba, the nights of February 23, 24, 25, 1998? This information would greatly help me to enhance a project I am presently working on. Thank you, whoever steps forward, for your help. Steve.

Steven LeClair
Montreal, Canada - Wednesday, April 15, 1998 at 05:41:13 (PDT)


This was my second, the 1st being in 1991. Both times I have selected a cruise for the exhibition, and they have both been successful. While it took some manuevering, the Veendam did make it to an excellent viewing position. As for this eclipse, I did particularly admire the planets that were visible and a beautiful corona, although everything else, such as the diamond ring was wonderful, too. The only thing is that I thought it might be darker. In any case, it was simply spectacular, and I can't wait to do it again either in 1999 or 2001.

Mike Marcelletti
Bloomingdale, MI 49026 - Sunday, April 12, 1998 at 15:49:28 (PDT)


On July 11, 1991, Garth O'Donnell and I went deep sea fishing off Kaneohe Bay on the north shore of Oahu, Hawaii. With winds at 15 to 20 knots it was a brisk morning on a 19'6" center console. It was a cloudy day and most of the people in Hawaii missed the eclipse. Because we were out several miles from the island the cloud cover was less dense and though the eclipse was not total we were able to watch it without filter as the clouds were acting as the perfect filter. The most amazing thing was the sea birds, some returning home and others just sitting on the water totally confused by the bizarre early morning sunset. We did later fullfil our mission with a good size "Ono" (known as a Wahoo to many). It was a memorable experience.

Kelly Faulkner
Kaneohe, HI US - Friday, March 27, 1998 at 00:48:47 (PST)


My wife and I love Total Eclipses. We went to Aruba to see this one. Everyone said in Aruba you don't need to worry about the weathaid, at least ONCE in my life I am determined to see a total solar eclipse. The fact that this one was in Aruba (in February) made it a rather easy sell, with no objections from the rest of the clan. I knew how awe inspiring it would be and tried my best to get them to understand the significance of the event, although I don't think they completely believed me. Well, we came, we saw, we conquered, and everyone in my family agreed that it was FANTASTIC. I am so glad we made the trip, and now I've made converts out of the wife and kids - they are very glad we went also. I was particularly struck by the sight of the birds flying back to their nests, and the indescribable color of the sky during totallity. Although I took lots of pictures (some of which turned out rather good) and saw replays of it on CNN, no pictures or video can even come close to the stunning beauty of the actual event. To those who have seen one, you understand what I say. To those of you who haven't, take my advice and do whatever it takes to go see one. I guarantee you will not be disappointed.

Jack Schenck
DE USA - Wednesday, March 04, 1998 at 22:03:54 (PST)


I observed the most impressive and overwhelming experience in my life in Maracaibo, Venezuela last 26 february. I was in the capital city, Caracas the day before and still had doubts regarding if a solar eclipse is worth traveling to see. I finally encouraged myself and took the first plane to Maracaibo. The most amazing thing to me is the weird feeling of quietness that comes to the enviroment just a few seconds before totality then like a dream you see the sunlight being eaten by the moon and a rare darkness devour everything. Definitely, this is the most beautiful thing thaty you can ever witness in your life. If you can travel to see the next total eclipse, go ! you'll never regret it.

Javier Rondon
Venezuela - Wednesday, March 04, 1998 at 09:55:32 (PST)


I observed my first eclipse from the island of Taboga off the coast of Panama. This area was in 95% of totality. Even though Feb. is the driest month of the year, the clouds wanted to get all the attention. The day was very cloudy which forced us to look at the sky without the mylar lenses we had purchased for this event. We saw a phenomena which I had not heard of or read about before. The sunlight there was reflected off the edges of several clouds making it seems as though there were several 'suns' in the sky. In fact all of these 'suns' were brighter than the eclipsed sun. I would like others to let me know if they also experienced this. The sky darkened as though a storm was approaching. The beeze turned a few degrees cooler and we did see a few birds come is as if to roost. All of these were expected effects of the eclipse. We used a camera with a zoom lense and filters to take pictures at 15 min intervals (and cloud permitting). I was naive enough not to understand the difference between 95% and 100%. Trust me, I will not make that mistake again. Next time (2018?) I will bring the family, make sure I can be within the area of 100%, and I will be more aware of the weather.

Jerima King
Colorado Springs, CO USA - Tuesday, March 03, 1998 at 13:54:20 (PST)


I had seen pictures. I thought I knew what to expect. I was totally floored as I watched the total eclipse in Aruba 2/26/98. We set up just outside the Queen Beatrix Airport. When totality began, you could hear cheering and honking horns all over the island.

Jen Marrs
Framingham, MA USA - Monday, March 02, 1998 at 11:43:29 (PST)


I viewed the eclipse from the University of the Virgin Islands on the St. Thomas, US Virgin Islands campus. It was 90% near totality. Next to my kids, it was the most beautiful thing I've ever experienced.

Johann Creque
St. Thomas, VI US - Monday, March 02, 1998 at 10:53:09 (PST)


Just returned from Aruba. Had a magnificent eclipse experience. This is eclipse number five for me. Started my addiction on February 26, 1979 in Saskatchewan, Canada. Other eclipses viewed were in Mazatlan, Mexico (1991); Potosi, Bolivia 1994; Darkhan, Mongolia 1997. The 1998 Carribean eclipse ranks as my number two eclipse experience but only because the first good one is always the best. I took my entire family with me this time (wife and three sons 14,12,10) we watched from atop the highest point on the island of Aruba at a peak called Yamanota. We could see the entire island from our vantage point. Others will report that the unsettled weather gave them cause for concern and that is also what happened with us. The difference, however, is that we could see the weather coming in off the ocean and for us it was a matter of determining how long it would take to reach us and, when it did, how long it would take to blow over us. We got rain (the first in five months on the island) we got heavy cloud and we got that sinking feeling that this one would not be ours to see but about 15 minutes before totality, the skies cleared and stayed that way. During totality, we could see people setting off fireworks all over the island. The runway lights came on at the airport and, at the prison on the island all of the bright sodium lights came on - a poignant reminder for the incarcerated that even in the path of totality, crime has unexpected costs. The best thing about an eclipse for me is being with people who have never actually experienced one before. It's one thing to have seen a movie or videotape of an eclipse or have read up on them but quite another to experience it. Some people, like the very sombre and reserved Swiss computer programmer I met while scouting viewing locations was still emotionally and physically overwhemed by the experience three days after the event. He told me that just shutting his eyes and remembering what happened was enough to make him extremely emotional. We were blessed with clear skies and a marvellous eclipse, saw both diamond rings but this time no 360 degree sunset. It appeared to be absorbed by ocean cloud banks. Many people viewed the eclipse from the beach or at their hotels. We made it an expedition. So much of our experiences these days are mediated through television and special effects we thought it important that our kids clearly understood that this was not just something that you get up from your lawn chair and your drink to witness it before returning to whatever you were doing.

Don Fleming
Edmonton, Ab Canada - Sunday, March 01, 1998 at 20:56:59 (PST)


Last Thursday was my first experience of totality. I was about 600 yards north of Baby Beach on the south-east corner of Aruba. The most remarkable thing was when third contact occured. It was as if someone had struck an arc, and everything was shimmering for a moment.

Paul Hunsberger
Mason, OH USA - Sunday, March 01, 1998 at 19:37:20 (PST)


I was on Palm Beach in Aruba on the 26th. The two things that really struck me were how sharp shadows became in the last few minutes before and after totality. I also saw shadow bands on a white sheet I had laid out. They were faint at first, but came very prominent just prior to the diamond ring.

Jeff Wilson
Madison, WI USA - Sunday, March 01, 1998 at 18:52:18 (PST)


We were fortunate enough to be on a cruise in the carribean aboard the Monarch of the Seas and the day planned to be in the exact location for totality. The captian of the ship along with Charles Perry posistioned the ship as such and we experienced one of the most awesome sights on earth. The top deck of the ship grew almost silent as planets and stars appeared. It was incredible!! Our ship was posistioned between Guadalupe and Monserrat and if the total eclipse was not enough the active volcano on Monserrat decided to add a little more flavour by having a minor erruption spewing a cloud of smoke. The cheers on the ship when we hit totality is certainly an experience my wife and I will never forget

John Andrews
Old Orchard Beach, me usa - Sunday, March 01, 1998 at 17:39:38 (PST)


It was an unforgettable experience,the light turn down like a dimmer