EduNews Fall 2002

Exploratorium EduNews is sent out in an email text format four times a year to teachers, school librarians, school administrators, professional developers, and others involved in K-12 education. Each issue includes announcements about Exploratorium-produced Webcasts, print publications, new online resources, and updates about our initiatives in teaching and learning.
Feel free to forward this to you colleagues and, if they like it, they can sign up for their own free copy at: <http://www.exploratorium.edu/edunews>

Contents

1 - ON THE WEB: GLOBAL CHANGES
2 - EXPLORATORIUM LEARNING STUDIO RESOURCE GUIDE: EARTH SYSTEM SCIENCE
3 - NEW BOOK FROM THE EXPLORATORIUM STAFF
4 - NEXT IRON SCIENCE TEACHER: HALLOWEEN EDITION
5 - NOT FADE AWAY, ONE MAN'S JOURNEY INTO BLINDNESS
6 - NEUROSCIENCE TREASURES FROM K-12 INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA CENTER

1 - ON THE WEB: GLOBAL CHANGES
http://www.exploratorium.edu/climate
Scientists all over the world are studying the changes taking place in the earth's climate; discover how they reach their conclusions at our new Global Climate Change: Research Explorer Web site. Find the information that climate researchers use to examine trends in the earth's atmosphere, oceans, glaciers and ice sheets, and living organisms. Explore data on everything from atmospheric temperatures and polar ice to ocean currents and coral reefs--including the complex world of climate modeling. (The content of this site is appropriate for high school and older with scientific curiosity but not necessarily a scientific background.) See what's currently happening in the study of global climate change by logging on to <http://www.exploratorium.edu/climate>

2 - EXPLORATORIUM LEARNING STUDIO RESOURCE GUIDE: EARTH SYSTEM SCIENCE
http://saturn.exploratorium.edu/ls/infosources/EarthSystemInfo.html
The Exploratorium's Learning Studio has created several web Resource Guides for educators. In this issue we are featuring Earth System Science, "An integrated approach to the study of the Earth that stresses investigations of the interactions among the Earth's components in order to explain Earth dynamics, evolution, and global change." (Earth Observatory Glossary)

For a full list of our web Resource Guides for Educators, see:
<http://www.exploratorium.edu/ls/infosources/ResGuides.html>

3 - NEW BOOK FROM THE EXPLORATORIUM STAFF
THE MATH EXPLORER: GAMES AND ACTIVITIES FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL YOUTH GROUPS by Pat Murphy, Lori Lambertson, Pearl Tesler, and the Exploratorium. San Francisco: Key Curriculum Press, 2002.

Representing a new direction for the Exploratorium, THE MATH EXPLORER: GAMES AND ACTIVITIES FOR MIDDLE SCHOOL YOUTH GROUPS applies to middle school mathematics the hands-on, minds-on teaching methods that have worked so well in science.

THE MATH EXPLORER contains twenty-four games, puzzles, experiments, and projects using inexpensive and readily found materials such as used greeting cards or plastic soda bottles. With these activities, middle schoolers will practice a variety of mathematics skills from problem solving and graphing to fractions and ratios while having a great time. The result of a three-year development process supported by the National Science Foundation, MATH EXPLORER activities have been tested-and approved-by groups of young people and homeschoolers across the nation.

THE MATH EXPLORER, designed with out-of-school-time groups in mind, offers advice on how to use each activity-leaders do not have to be "expert" in math to confidently guide their groups. Planning charts and materials lists enable leaders to quickly decide if they have the time and supplies for an activity, and each activity features a "Where's the Math" section that offers simple, straightforward explanations of the math involved. A handy glossary clearly defines all mathematical terms.

For more information about THE MATH EXPLORER and to download a sample activity, visit the museum store at <http://www.exploratoriumstore.com/>.

4 - NEXT IRON SCIENCE TEACHER: HALLOWEEN EDITION
http://saturn.exploratorium.edu/iron_science/
Join us for this fun event via the Web or in person where the secret ingredient will be used to create fantastic, inventive science activities by Exploratorium staff on Friday October 25, 2002, 12 noon (PST or GMT-8). (Past Halloween webcast secret ingredients have included candy and pumpkins.) If you cannot watch it live or want to see last Halloween's edition as well as archives of all our past Iron Science Teacher webcasts, go to <http://saturn.exploratorium.edu/iron_science/>

5 - NOT FADE AWAY, ONE MAN'S JOURNEY INTO BLINDNESS
http://www.exploratorium.edu/seeing/notfadeaway
Designed as a joint on-the-floor and web exhibit, NOT FADE AWAY profiles Joel Deutsch, a writer with retinitis pigmentosa who has gradually lost his vision over 25 years and is now legally blind. The site includes conversations between Joel and Michael Pearce, an Exploratorium staffer, journal articles by Joel, video clips and animation as well as an alternative site optimized for low-vision users. By sharing Joel's experiences on subjects ranging from daily life, getting around, work, love, memory, technology, and politics, we hope to offer some reflection on a subject that impacts deeply on our perception of seeing - that of not seeing. We hope you'll share your comments and questions in the site's feedback section.

6 - NEUROSCIENCE TREASURES FROM K-12 INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA CENTER
http://www.k12imc.org
Enhance the Exploratorium's displays in neuroscience with related links at other labs http://www.k12imc.org/pg3187.cfm across the U.S. Even middle school students can participate in the huge Human Genome Project <http://www.k12imc.org/pg3186.cfm> and debate its implications with their own data. Take advantage of access to world-class online experts <http://www.k12imc.org/pg1015.cfm>!

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