Exploratorium home Exploratorium home Explo.tv
Browse media archive by:
Search 
Running Time:
04:20
Tsering Wangmo Dhompa is a poet who collects inspiration from the everyday--walking in the city, looking at people, listening to language--as well as from her imagination and memory. In this show we explore her process and product.

Project: Driven: True Stories of Inspiration | Browse All

Date: July 15, 2011
Format: Interview
Category: Popular Culture
Subject(s): art
Running Time:
0:27:33
What if we did contact another intelligent life form in the universe? What should we say? What traits best represent our humanity? Douglas Vakoch, the SETI Institute’s Director of Interstellar Message Composition, is working with scientists, artists, linguists, composers, and others to imagine how to speak for our planet.

Project: Origins: Astrobiology: The Search for Life | Browse All

Date: November 22, 2003
Format: Interview
Category: Science in Action
Subject(s): Astronomy/Space Science
Running Time:
1:42:45
Can a question influence its answer? Discover the power of verbal overshadowing--ways in which words enhance or distract from different sensory memories. Dr. Schooler, Associate Professor of Cognitive Psychology at the University of Pittsburgh and research scientist at the Learning Research and Development Center, will arrange a variety of sense-memory experiments, including wine-tasting and jellybean-tasting!

Project: Memory | Browse All

Date: December 6, 1998
Format: Interview
Category: Popular Culture
Subject(s): Cognitive Science/Psychology
Running Time:
2:02:21
What do you really remember? Dr. Jonathan Schooler and Dr. Elizabeth Loftus will discuss the highly controversial area of recovered memories. Dr. Schooler is Associate Professor of Cognitive Psychology at the University of Pittsburgh and a research scientist at the Learning Research and Development Center. Dr. Loftus is Professor Psychology and Adjunct Professor of Law at the University of Washington, Seattle.

Project: Memory | Browse All

Date: December 2, 1998
Format: Interview
Category: Popular Culture
Subject(s): Cognitive Science/Psychology
Running Time:
1:48:57
Does your child remember the same things you do? Not necessarily. Children are as good or better than adults at remembering events, but have difficulty remembering how, when, and why they learn things. This has implications for issues from eyewitness testimony to recovered memories. Alison Gopnik is Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley.

Project: Memory | Browse All

Date: November 11, 1998
Format: Interview
Category: Popular Culture
Subject(s): Cognitive Science/Psychology