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Running Time:
00:06:10
Get to know the grandfather of all instruments, the Pipe Organ. We talked with Schoenstein & Company Organ Builders about the process of designing, constructing, and fine-tuning their instruments.

Project: Resonance | Browse All

Date: November 13, 2013
Format: Demonstration / Activity
Category: Everyday Science
Subject(s): General Science, Art
Running Time:
00:04:17
The Exploratorium’s new home has an ace up its sleeve for the next big earthquake—a single seismic joint, 300 feet long and two feet wide, will isolate the entire pier structure from the rest of San Francisco. Watch here as the bulkhead at Pier 15 is readied for the installation of the seismic joint.

Project: Exploratorium at the Piers | Browse All

Date: November 20, 2012
Format: Demonstration / Activity
Category: Everyday Science
Subject(s): General Science
Running Time:
00:06:27
Admit it: Hasn't the Godzilla inside you always wanted to grab the Golden Gate Bridge and shake it silly? Finally, you can. In honor of the iconic span's 75th birthday, Exploratorium exhibit developer Dave Fleming presents a dynamic model of the Golden Gate Bridge. What happens to the bridge during an earthquake? How about strong winds and heavy traffic? The model dances and wiggles realistically, displaying the same vibrational modes and motions that occur in the actual bridge.

Project: Science in the City | Browse All

Date: May 9, 2012
Format: Demonstration / Activity
Category: Science in Action
Subject(s): General Science
Running Time:
02:50
Josh Short from the Cardboard Institute of Technology walks us through their latest installation, Subterrain, on the Exploratorium floor!

Project: Miscellaneous | Browse All

Date: March 16, 2011
Format: Expedition
Category: Popular Culture
Subject(s): Art
Running Time:
00:18:09
Terje Isungset is one of Europe's most accomplished and innovative percussionists. With over two decades experience in jazz and Scandinavian music his work travels far beyond traditional boundaries. He's become more like a cross between a sound artist and a shaman. Isungset crafts his own instruments from natural elements found in Norway such as arctic birch, granite, slate, and even ice.

Project: Exploratorium Audio Salon | Browse All

Date: March 11, 2009
Format: Interview
Category: Popular Culture
Subject(s): Art
Running Time:
Can pets predict earthquakes? Do quakes happen more often at certain times of the day or year? And could a really big one mean the end of California? Exploratorium geologist Eric Muller separates earthquake fact from fiction.

Project: Faultline: Seismic Science at the Epicenter | Browse All

Date: April 3, 2006
Format: Interview
Category: Popular Science
Subject(s): Geology/Earth Science
Running Time:
Relive the Loma Prieta quake with our photographer, Amy Snyder, who was caught in an outhouse at the beach. Why didn't it, or any San Francisco skyscapers, collapse?

Project: Faultline: Seismic Science at the Epicenter | Browse All

Date: April 3, 2006
Format: Demonstration / Activity
Category: Popular Science
Subject(s): Geology/Earth Science
Running Time:
Join Exploratorium geologist Eric Muller on a tour of world-famous geological features to be found in the national parkland just north of the Golden Gate bridge.

Project: Faultline: Seismic Science at the Epicenter | Browse All

Date: April 3, 2006
Format: Expedition
Category: Popular Science
Subject(s): Geology/Earth Science
Running Time:
00:00:40
This wobbly luminescent sculpture by Liz Hickok is both art work and a simulation of how a San Francisco neighborhood might jiggle when the Big One strikes.

Project: Faultline: Seismic Science at the Epicenter | Browse All

Date: January 1, 2005
Format: Exhibit
Category: Popular Culture
Subject(s): Art, Geology/Earth Science
Running Time:
00:43:30
Julia Child and physicist Philip Morrison once cooked up (and sampled) "primordial soup," a mixture of ingredients said to be the materials from which life sprang on Earth. How accurate is this notion? David Deamer studies how some molecules self-assemble into order, and has developed new theories about how life evolved from components on Earth. We’ll talk with him, do hands-on experiments, and watch vintage footage of Julia Child tasting the soup. Guests: David Deamer, Director, UC Berkeley SETI Program, and Karen Kalumuk, Exploratorium staff scientist.

Project: Origins: Astrobiology: The Search for Life | Browse All

Date: November 16, 2003
Format: Interview
Category: Science in Action
Subject(s): Life Science/Biology, Chemistry