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Running Time:
00:01:15
Bears lumber across a pristine landscape in remote Kamchatka, Russia.

Project: Evidence: Extremophiles in Kamchatka | Browse All

Date: September 20, 2006
Format: Expedition
Category: Science in Action
Subject(s): Geology/Earth Science, Life Science/Biology
Running Time:
00:00:25
Discovered just 60 years ago, this remote valley in Russia is a treasure trove for scientists studying microorganisms that survive under extreme conditions.

Project: Evidence: Extremophiles in Kamchatka | Browse All

Date: September 20, 2006
Format: Expedition
Category: Science in Action
Subject(s): Geology/Earth Science, Life Science/Biology
Running Time:
00:01:25
Tour the lab tent where scientists study the unique microbiology and geochemistry of the hot springs of Russia's Uzon Caldera.

Project: Evidence: Extremophiles in Kamchatka | Browse All

Date: September 20, 2006
Format: Expedition
Category: Science in Action
Subject(s): Geology/Earth Science, Life Science/Biology
Running Time:
00:00:34
Hot mud, boiling up in remote Russia.

Project: Evidence: Extremophiles in Kamchatka | Browse All

Date: September 20, 2006
Format: Expedition
Category: Science in Action
Subject(s): Geology/Earth Science, Life Science/Biology
Running Time:
00:00:25
The sun goes down in a cloudy sky in Kamchatka, Russia.

Project: Evidence: Extremophiles in Kamchatka | Browse All

Date: September 20, 2006
Format: Expedition
Category: Science in Action
Subject(s): Geology/Earth Science, Life Science/Biology
Running Time:
00:04:24
Two Russian scientists--geologist Gennady Karpov and microbiologist Elizaveta Bonch-Osmolovskaya--discuss the unique volcanic features of the Uzon Caldera, the life forms living in the hot springs there, and the important questions they raise.

Project: Evidence: Extremophiles in Kamchatka | Browse All

Date: June 15, 2006
Format: Expedition
Category: Science in Action
Subject(s): Geology/Earth Science, Life Science/Biology
Running Time:
00:05:16
This clip introduces the 2006 expedition to remote Kamchatka, Russia. Twenty scientists arrive via helicopter to study the unique microbiology and geochemistry of the hot springs of the Uzon Caldera. Microorganisms that can survive the scalding temperatures and acidity in the springs are called extremophiles, and understanding these organisms helps answer questions about the origin and evolution of life on earth.

Project: Evidence: Extremophiles in Kamchatka | Browse All

Date: June 15, 2006
Format: Expedition
Category: Science in Action
Subject(s): Geology/Earth Science, Life Science/Biology
Running Time:
00:01:01
The remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Jason II measured temperatures as high as 200 degrees Celsius (392 degrees Fahrenheit) at these hydrothermal vents atop the Forecast Seamount in the Mariana Arc of the Pacific Ocean. Hydrothermal vents spew sulfur and other chemicals that support bacteria which use these chemicals to sustain life in a process called chemosynthesis. Snails and shrimp have colonized the site and are grazing on the chemosynthetic bacteria. Jason's suction sampler is used to collect some of these animals for analysis in the lab on board the ship.

Project: Voyages of Discovery: NOAA's Okeanos Explorer | Browse All

Date: May 1, 2006
Format: Expedition
Category: Science in Action
Subject(s): Life Science/Biology, Geology/Earth Science
Running Time:
00:45:13
A year and a half after entering Saturn's orbit, the Cassini spacecraft continued to gather exciting new information. Dr. Paul Doherty and Dr. Eric Weygren bring us up to date on the Cassini Mission and show stunning images of Saturn and its ever-growing assortment of moons.

Project: Saturn: Jewel of the Solar System | Browse All

Date: January 7, 2006
Format: Demonstration / Activity
Category: Science in Action
Subject(s): Astronomy/Space Science
Running Time:
00:47:21
On December 11, 2005, Opportunity, one of the twin rovers exploring Mars, celebrated its first Martian birthday. Opportunity had been on the red planet 687 Earth days, which is one Martian year. (A year is the time it takes a planet to make a complete loop around the sun). Join us for a look back over the those 687 days of discovery: what we learned, what we saw, and what questions remained unanswered.

Project: Return to Mars | Browse All

Date: December 11, 2005
Format: Demonstration / Activity
Category: Science in Action
Subject(s): astronomy/Space Science