place
people tools ideas live about
index
cern
hubble
antarctica
las cuevas
cold spring
arecibo
CERN:
Matter
Hubble:
Universe
Antarctica:
Extremes
Las Cuevas:
Biodiversity
Cold Spring:
DNA
Arecibo:
Astrobiology

Science makes for a good show-and-tell. There are experiments to do, pictures to make, animals to see, and ideas to debate. During the three years of this project, we made over 100 live-to-the-Web broadcasts, from places as far flung as the remote jungle of Belize and the glaciers of the South Pole. We watched as scientists unveiled never-before-seen images, and spent time with Nobel laureates. We even had the honor of chatting with scientists as their research was making headlines.


Our broadcasts reflect the vast landscape in which scientific research takes place today. There are conversations about widely accepted ideas, such as evolution and particle physics, and discussions of questions with murkier answers. What are the effects of a species on an ecosystem? What is the nature of the Higgs boson? Viewing our Webcasts, you can look over the shoulders of scientists, visit them where they work, and tour some of the world’s most elaborate machinery.


The Webcasts reflect the underlying structure of our project—looking at the people, places, tools, and ideas behind fundamental scientific research. Browsing the Webcasts by the location from which they were broadcast will give you a visceral sense of the places where science is happening. You will find these four thematic threads running through broadcasts from each place. Since there are so many Webcasts, here are some highlights:

(All Webcasts require the RealMedia player. Some of these links will launch the player directly.)

people
     
Local Knowledge
Meet the people whose life experience in the jungles of Belize is indispensable to researchers there.
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Preparing for Space
Astronaut John Grunsfeld shows us how astronauts train and what it’s like to service the Hubble Space Telescope.
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McMurdo Life
The cafes, meeting places, and back hallways of the Antarctic research station.
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Francis Collins
A chat with the man who heads up the Human Genome Project.
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place
     
Bats!
Join bat experts as they capture bats in Belize, and learn how bats are studied back at the Natural History Museum in London.
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A Look Inside CERN
Learn how was the world’s largest particle accelerator was constructed and how scientists use it.
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Last Stop Before Space
See us in "bunny suits" as we do the first ever live broadcast from the NASA clean room.
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Live from the South Pole
A visit with our crew at the bottom of the world.
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tools
     
Hunting Neutrinos in the Ice
Frozen miles deep in the ice forever, the AMANDA detector watches for the smallest particles in the universe.
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The Lab’s Most Powerful Eye
An inside-the-scenes tour of the scanning electron microscope, and a live scan of never-before-seen pollen grains.
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Antimatter: The Cool Tool Tour
The Exploratorium's Tom Humphrey takes you around CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator, from beam pipes to antihydrogen traps.
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Astronomy to Art: Making Hubble Heritage
Learn the secrets behind making those beautiful galactic images.
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ideas
Is It Alive?
Is there life elsewhere in the universe? Exploratorium biologist Karen Kalumuck gets us thinking about what that question really means.
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The quest for the Higgs Boson
Hear how this elusive particle could change our understanding of physics.
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Jungle Jaguars
Zoologist Marcella Kelly tells us what she’s learned about the health of the rainforest from jaguars in the jungles of Belize.
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Making Sense of What Hubble Gives Us
Meet some scientists who will show us how their images have changed our understanding of the galaxy.
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