community and creativity digital games access school policy


Author Biographies

Dr. Katherine McMillan Culp | Dr. Margaret Honey | Dr. Sherry Hsi | Professor Brenda Laurel | Peter Lyman | Dr. Nichole Pinkard | Andrew Rotherham |Dr. Kristina Hooper Woolsey

Dr. Katherine McMillan Culp is a senior project director at Education Development Center Inc./Center for Children & Technology. She has thirteen years of experience in managing evaluations of innovative programs to improve the quality of technology use in K-12 classrooms and informal educational settings. For the past five years she has overseen evaluations of several of the Intel Corporation’s Innovations in Education initiatives. She has also conducted a series of program evaluations studying strategies for using modeling and simulation tools in science classrooms, as well as qualitative studies of technology integration at both the classroom and district level. She is a graduate of Amherst College and holds a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from Teachers College, Columbia University.

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Dr. Sherry Hsi. Dr. Hsi is the Director of Research for the Center for Learning and Teaching at the Exploratorium. Her interests lie at the intersection of learning, design, and technology. Her research focuses on understanding how to design social contexts for learning, facilitation, and deeper reflection mediated by new media and networked technologies. At the Exploratorium, she is evaluating online museum visitors and studying how web content, handhelds, and wireless technologies can be instructionally-designed to support nomadic inquiry. In 2003, she was awarded a grant from the NSF National Science Digital Library program to create an exhibit-based science learning and teaching digital library. Before joining the Exploratorium, Dr. Hsi was a post-doc scholar with the NSF-funded Center for Innovative Learning Technologies (1998-2000) in the area of ubiquitous computing studying the use of Palm computers by students and was on the faculty at the first Virtual High School. She is the co-author of the book Computers, Teachers, Peers: Science Learning Partners and the PI of the MacArthur Project "Digita-mediated learning for next generation youth." She is a graduate of the University of California Berkeley’s College of Engineering and holds a PhD in science education.

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Peter Lyman is Professor in the School of Information Management and Systems at UC Berkeley, an interdisciplinary school that combines computer science and social science in research and teaching about emerging information cultures and tools.  He received his BA from Stanford University in Philosophy, MA from Berkeley in Political Science, and PhD in Political Science from Stanford. He currently serves on the editorial boards of the American Behavioral Scientist; The Journal of Electronic Publishing; Information Technology, Education and Society; E-government; and Vectors: A Journal of Culture and Technology in a Dynamic Vernacular. He is a member of the Board of Directors of Sage Publishing, Inc., a social science publisher, and serves on the Technical Advisory Committee of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.  Previously he served on the Board of Directors of EDUCOM, the Research Libraries Group (RLG), The Babbage Institute, the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR), the Art History Information Project at the Getty Trust, and the Internet Archive. His research fields include the ethnographic study of online social relationships and communities, educational software, technology transfer from research communities to businesses.  In 2004 he completed a study of how much new information is produced every year [See <http://www.sims.berkeley.edu/research/projects/how-much-info-2003/)>
http://www.sims.berkeley.edu/research/projects/how-much-info-2003/
)] and a study of the metaphors that guide information policy ("Information Superhighways, Virtual Communities and Digital Libraries: Information Society Metaphors as Political Rhetoric" Technological Visions [Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2004] 201-218.].  He is currently working with Mimi Ito of the Annenberg Center at USC on a grant from the MacArthur Foundation to understand how kids' informal learning is being shaped by new media.

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Professor Brenda Laurel is the Chair of the graduate Media Design Program at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. Professor Laurel is a designer, researcher and writer. Her work focuses on interactive narrative, human-computer interaction, and cultural aspects of technology. She holds an M.F.A. and Ph.D. in theatre from the Ohio State University. Her doctoral dissertation was the first to propose a comprehensive architecture for computer-based interactive fantasy and fiction. She was one of the founding members of the research staff at Interval Research Corporation in Palo Alto, California, where she coordinated research activities exploring gender and technology, and co-produced and directed the Placeholder Virtual Reality project. She was also one of the founders and VP/Design of a spinoff company from Interval - Purple Moon - formed to market products based on this research. She has worked as a software designer, producer, and researcher for companies including Atari, Activision, and Apple. Prof. She is editor of the book, The Art of Human-Computer Interface Design [Addison-Wesley 1990] and author of Computers as Theatre [Addison-Wesley 1991; 2nd edition 1993], and a collection of essays entitled Severed Heads. Her newest books is Design Research [M.I.T. Press, 2004].

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Dr. Nichole Pinkard is the Director of Technology and Research Associate, Center for School Improvement, University of Chicago. Prof. Pinkard received her bachelor’s degree in Computer Science from Stanford University and a master’s degree in Computer Science and Ph.D. in Education from Northwestern University where she developed software to leverage background knowledge to teach beginning reading. She received the Jan Hawkins Award for Early Career Contributions to Humanistic Research and Scholarship in Learning Technologies and an NSF Early CAREER Fellowship. Her current scholarly interests include culturally responsive computer-based learning environments; cultural contexts affecting learning broadly and literacy specifically, visualization tools to support analysis of data, gender and technology, and ubiquitous scaffolds.

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Andrew Rotherham is co-founder and co-director of Education Sector, a national education policy think tank and a senior fellow at the Progressive Policy Institute. In addition he serves on the Virginia Board of Education, a position he was appointed to by Governor Mark Warner in 2005. Previously, Rotherham served at The White House as Special Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy during the Clinton Administration. Rotherham is the author of numerous articles and papers about education and co-editor of three books on educational policy. He serves on advisory boards and committees for organizations including the American Academy for Liberal Education, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Broad Foundation, Common Good, National Governors Association, National Association of Charter School Authorizers, and New Schools Venture Fund. He is also a trustee of the Cesar Chavez Public Charter High School for Public Policy and member of the board of directors for the Charter School Leadership Council and the board of directors for the National Council on Teacher Quality.

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Dr. Kristina Hooper Woolsey is a cognitive psychologist who has pursued the study of images and learning for more than thirty years. This pursuit has included basic research investigations, technology and end-user innovations, multimedia product design and educational policy experience. Woolsey completed her Ph.D. in 1973 at UCSD in cognitive science. She then went to UCB in Landscape Architecture as a Postdoctoral Fellow to investigate images of places. This work led very directly to her participation in the "Aspen Project" at the Architecture Machine Group at MIT, now the MIT Media Lab. She was a Visiting Faculty Member at MIT and a Faculty Member at UCSC where she received a number of federal grants to develop and study geographic information systems and the incorporation of imagery in computers to encourage mathematical understanding. Pursuing her interest in emerging technology that supported image-rich conversations, Woolsey became the Director of the Atari Research Lab, a think tank that explored ideas of virtual reality, robotics, electronic encyclopedia, gaming and other "future uses" of computers. She joined Apple Computer, Inc. in 1985, where she was a founding member of the human interface group as well as the co-founder and Director of the Apple Multimedia Lab. At the Multimedia Lab she established a range of collaborations for Apple Computer, Inc., in the area of multimedia and education, including collaborations with LucasFilm, the National Geographic Society, the Smithsonian Institution and Scholastic Publishing. In 1995 she was the executive producer, author and writer of VizAbility, a CD-ROM and Handbook which explored visualization and thinking. In 1998 to become a technology/education/design consultant. She worked with the James Irvine Foundation for four years on their CORAL program, an afterschool program for underserved youth. Woolsey is currently the "visionary" member of the New Media Centers, a consortium of universities and museums dedicated to the development of new digital media.

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Dr. Margaret Honey,Vice President of the Education Development Center and Director of EDC's Center for Children and Technology, has worked in the field of educational technology since 1981. Her primary research interests include the role of technology in school reform and student achievement, the use of telecommunications technology to support online learning communities, and issues of equity associated with the development and use of technology. She conducted the first national survey to look at K-12 educators' use of telecommunications (1992), and in collaboration with Bank Street College, she developed one of the first projects to cultivate the Internet as an environment in which to advance teacher professional development (1993). For more than a decade she has been associated with district-wide school reform efforts in Union City, New Jersey, nationally recognized for its success in incorporating technology throughout its programs. Beyond overseeing CCT's extensive involvement with educational technology research and development nationwide, she is personally involved in several projects aimed at helping educators make effective use of data, including efforts to use technology tools to support data-driven decision making. In 1999 she was appointed to the Department of Education's Expert Panel on Educational Technology, charged with the responsibility for creating a framework to be used in assessing the effectiveness of all educational technology programs. Dr. Honey regularly contributes to educational publications, and presents at major technology and education conferences. She has served on the board of the Consortium for School Networking, and currently serves on advisory boards of math, science and technology projects nationwide. She holds a doctorate in developmental psychology from Columbia University.

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