CALENDAR: Discover what's happening when

“Original Soundtracks #5” and “Starfield”

Performance by Jem Finer
In conversation with Sarah Cahill

Join us for the fourth event in the series, this time featuring Jem Finer, a UK-based artist, musician, and composer. Finer has worked in film, photography, installation, and experimental and popular music since studying computer science in the 1970s. Much of his work explores systems and processes playing out over extremes of time and space.

For this event, he’ll offer two performances. In an inversion of the usual supporting role of the soundtrack, Finer gathered sound using a video camera, then draws upon this raw material to compose improvisational films whose visual component is a byproduct of these sound juxtapositions in "Original Soundtracks #5," which will also include new material recorded in San Francisco. In addition, he’ll perform "Starfield." Each star shines with a unique spectrum of light frequencies. By translating these into sound, Finer generated the raw material for this celestial composition.

Resonance performances are held in the Exploratorium’s new Kanbar Forum and enlivened by its state-of-the-art, 72-channel Constellation sound system, providing an intimate experience of each event’s sonic details.


Jem Finer

Jem Finer is a UK-based artist, musician, and composer. Since studying computer science in the 1970s, Finer has worked in photography, film, installation, and experimental and popular music.

Much of Finer’s work explores systems and processes playing out over extremes of time and space. His best-known works include "Longplayer," a 1,000-year musical composition, and "Score for a Hole in the Ground," a permanent, self-sustaining musical installation in a forest in Kent that is activated by gravity and falling water.

During a two-year artist residency in the Astrophysics Department at Oxford University, Finer created several works including two sculptural observatories that collected radiofrequency signals from space and translated them into sound.

Finer is currently developing a massive, water-driven computer that composes music while performing its calculations.