Sport Science


A new book from the Exploratorium and
published by
Henry Holt and Company!



Check out the Questions and Answers section adapted from The Sporting Life.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This page was last updated July 22, 1998

 

The Sporting Life
by Susan Davis and Sally Stephens with the Exploratorium.

 
The Sporting Life

Purchase this book online
at the Exploratorium Store.
When we wonder why one athlete can excel where another does not, or why we throw a football with spiral action, we're really exploring human physiology and aerodynamics. When we argue about metal versus wooden bats, or decide which running shoes to buy, we've entered the worlds of physics and engineering

Davis and Stephens discuss such intriguing matters as how the length of your toes may offer clues about your athletic perfomance, or why Michael Jordan appears to hover in mid-air. There's even a thorough discussion of the role of the mind: perception, visualization, streaks, and the secret of the that special time and place that athletes call "the zone."

Susan Davis is a freelance journalist who writes extensively for Sports Illustrated.
Sally Stephens is trained as an astrophysicist and now devotes her time to writing.

Available Now! From Henry Holt and Company.

Purchase this book online
at the Exploratorium Store.

The Sporting Life is one of the first books in the Accidental Scientist Series.

The Accidental Scientist
We rarely stop to think about it, but every time we hit a golf ball, water the garden, or whip up a batch of egg whites, we become "accidental scientists" putting universal laws to work. Did you ever wonder why fluorescent lights help plants grow? Or why graphite tennis rackets are better than wood ones?

For nearly thirty years, San Francisco's famed Exploratorium has been enthralling visitors with its unique approach--irreverant, entertaining, yet always informative--to reveal the unexpected science we encounter in our everyday lives. Serving up fun facts, hands-on activities, anecdotes, and thought-provoking scientific curiosities, the Accidental Scientist series will enrich and expand our understanding of the hows and whys behind our favorite activities.


   ©1997 The Exploratorium