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Icelandic sculpture
 

Icelandic sculptureIceland: Technology trendsetters

You may think that Iceland, an island in the North Sea that's home to only 270,000 people, would be isolated, shrouded in fog, and a bit medieval. While it's true that the place is small enough to retain a few mythological traditions, it's also just the right size to support some modern technology experiments. The country is leading the way in cell phone innovations and alternative energy. Not to mention that its controversial nationwide genetic database is a treasure trove for genetic researchers. Its volcanoes are studied by researchers around the world, and its shifting magnetic fields play tricks on compasses.
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The stories:

High-tech trend setters
(1/22/2001)

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Genetic Database
(1/23/2001)

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Lava Wonderland
(1/24/2001)

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Can Iceland Run on Hydrogen?
(1/25/2001)

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The Family Name Game
(1/26/2001)

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Iceland's Volcanoes
Poised on the seam of two techtonic plates, Iceland is the most volcanic place on Earth.

A geyser in your living room
We'll show you how you can make an Icelandic geyser out of stuff you have at home.

Polar opposites
In some spots on the map of Iceland, north is south and south is north. But wait, why does that happen? The Exploratorium's Paul Dogherty explains.

Where it's at
An interactive map illustrating Icelands geological wonders

Links
From hot springs to alternative energy, there's heaps on interesting experiments happening in Iceland. Read up on some of them, and take a photo tour or two.


copyright Exploratorium 2001