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00:02:13
Science of Cocktails presented the artistry of master mixologists shaken with the science behind the craft. Taking an in-depth, interactive look at the physics, chemistry, and biology of cocktails, this first-time Exploratorium fundraiser engaged guests in an exploration of their favorite libations like they've never experienced before.

00:04:52
Newton wasn’t really ready to believe that light was a wave, and so he didn’t see what was in front of his eyes. Staff physicist Paul Doherty tells how to do the same experiment that Newton did back in the 1650s to see the wave nature of light.

00:10:10
Put kids’ skepticism to work! Children’s book author David Schwartz explains how a class disagreed with the numbers in one of his math books, and set out to prove him wrong!

00:04:40
Exploratorium staff educator Don Rathjen makes some noise with this activity about Newton’s laws.

00:05:20
Exploratorium staff physicist Thomas Humphrey explains what temperature and color have to do with one another.

00:04:40
When this chemistry teacher entered her portable classroom as a new teacher, she was fresh from West Africa—and there was a lot she didn’t know.

00:03:19
Catch a glimpse of the floor as viewed from atop the concrete pendulum on the Exploratorium's Mezzanine.

00:05:51
Nobody can really teach you anything—rather, you have to learn it for yourself. So how can you help your students understand science? TI staff educator Modesto Tamez shares some thoughts about helping students make ideas their own.

00:25:13
Have you ever wondered exactly what clouds are made of, or what the difference is between a cumulus and lenticular cloud? Clouds are an ever-present, ever-changing part of our natural landscape. They come in a huge variety of shapes and sizes, and capture our imagination with their endless permutations. Join Exploratorium Senior Scientist Paul Doherty for a live Webcast about cloud physics. Paul will discuss the basic makeup of clouds, and explore some of the aspects that make them such a rich part of our daily lives.

00:08:39
Geeks have strange hobbies. Staff physicist Paul Doherty plays the corrugated plastic tube, also known as a “whirly,” and explains the surprising science behind the sound.