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00:40:13
Scientists at Palmer Research Station in Antarctica talk about their research: How is the rich marine ecosystem just offshore responding to melting sea ice and global climate change?

00:02:08
Shots of the Barrow Environmental Observatory in Barrow, Alaska.

00:01:36
B-Roll for playback during webcast, "Tundra and Climate Change with Steve Hastings," on 5/24/08. Footage includes shots of data gathering, facilities and landscape at the Barrow Environmental Observatory.

05:12:09
On November 8, 2006, Mercury slowly slid across the face of the sun during a relatively rare event known as a transit. The Exploratorium's Live@ crew was at the Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona to cover the event. This webcast includes a brief history of Kitt Peak and its 21 telescopes.

00:59:15
Astronomers in many parts of the world watched as Venus moved across the disk of the Sun, one of the rarest planetary alignments. The Exploratorium webcast this historic event from Greece.

00:10:19
Join the Exploratorium's Dr. Paul Doherty as he visits a "sculpture to observe the stars" in northern New Mexico, where the Sangre de Cristo Mountains meet the eastern plains. There artist Charles Ross is creating an art installation that is also a star observatory. This major earthwork has two main elements: the Star Tunnel, which allows you to walk through the entire history of the earth's changing alignment to our North Star, Polaris; and the Solar Pyramid, where one can visually experience an hour of the earth's rotation.

00:37:05
We stayed up with Exploratorium scientist Ron Hipschman at the Lick Observatory in San Jose, California, for the best view we've had of Mars in a long, long time. At midnight on August 27, Earth and Mars passed closer to one another than they have in 60,000 years. Astronomers were on hand to tell us all about our nearest neighbor—its geography, orbit, and why both NASA and the European Space Agency have chosen this time to launch robotic missions to Mars.

00:18:34
Dr. Carol Greider is a professor of molecular biology and genetics at Johns Hopkins University. She worked with molecular biologist Elizabeth Blackburn to discover the role of telomeres—segments of DNA that protect and stabilize the ends of chromosomes. Dr. Greider tells us about her work and shares her thoughts about the importance of mentors for women in science.

00:26:05
Dr. Bruce Stillman is the Director of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, a position he inherited from James Watson in 1994. He continues his own research at the lab on DNA replication. In this program, Dr. Stillman describes the unique culture of science at CSHL, explores future directions of research, and tells us what he learned as an administrator for Dr. Watson.

00:25:57
Dr. Walter Gilbert, a physicist who turned to molecular biology in 1960, won the Nobel prize in chemistry in 1980 for determining the base sequences of DNA. His recent research has concentrated on the structure of genes and the evolution of DNA sequences. In this Webcast, Dr Gilbert tells us how physicists have helped drive discoveries in molecular biology, and the relationship between private and university research efforts.