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00:32:06
Brendan Kelly learned from Inuit hunters how to train Labrador retrievers to find ringed seals. This allows Brendan and his colleagues to set up live-capture nets to keep the seals from diving after they come up for air. The seals are tagged with satellite transponders so they can be tracked to learn about their breeding grounds and migration habits.

00:28:47
One of the first projects to move into the new BASC(Barrow Arctic Science Consortium)facility, the archeologist team of Anne Jensen and Laura Thomas, are preparing for their season of digging up the past. We will catch up with them in their lab: take a look at their tools and specimens, and learn about their plans as they prepare for their upcoming field work.

00:19:01
In our second Webcast with biologist Steve Hastings, we'll learn about his collaborative research experiment in Barrow. As the climate changes in the Arctic, the amount of water on the tundra is affected (more rainfall, shorter freeze periods, changing sea levels,etc). How will these changes effect the tundra's release of greenhouse gases? Will less permafrost mean more or less CO2 in the atmosphere? Will warmer temperatures cause more evaporation? Will that be good or bad for the environment?

00:22:45
The Census of Marine Life is a growing global network of researchers in more than 70 nations engaged in a ten year (2000-2010) mission to assess and explain the diversity, distribution, and abundance of marine life in the oceans. Rolf Gradinger is an expert in Sea Ice Communities, studying the tiny animals that actually live inside the ice and those that live on the bottom of the ice sheets. We'll chat with Rolf about his current work, drilling ice cores just off Barrow, and looking for some of the world's most unique fauna.

00:16:26
Meet Barrow scientist and Ice Stories blogger Steve Hastings, who is investigating how the tundra responds to climate change. What exactly is the tundra? How can vegetation, no more than 3 inches tall, play such an important role in the world's climate? Why does the tundra release so much CO2?

00:16:16
The Exploratorium's remote crew has landed in Barrow, AK, to showcase the vast array of science being conducted at this northernmost tip of the continent. Join us for this introduction to Barrow: where is it? why are so many scientists here? why are May and June such important times?

00:04:14
Preview the Exploratorium's Mind exhibit, an exhibit collection four years in the making.

In Mind, you are the exhibit. Experience your own thoughts, feelings and actions in provocative and unexpected ways in this major new 5000-square-foot collection. Discover insights into how you make decisions, the kinds of things you do (or don’t) pay attention to, and the changing landscapes and intriguing effects of your own emotions. Mind is made possible with the support of the National Science Foundation.

01:09:02
Join us as UC Berkeley's Dr. Robert Levenson interviews acclaimed psychologist Dr. Paul Ekman about his 40 years of research into the universality of human facial expressions. The talk includes photographs and never-before-seen footage from Dr. Ekman's fieldwork among the Fore, an isolated New Guinea tribe he first visited in the early 1960s.

00:00:15
Aeolian Landscape is an exhibit in which a miniature wind-swept desert landscape is recreated by an electric fan and finely ground sand that mimics the process of wind picking up and depositing small particles. Visitors can change the direction of the fan, influencing the shape of the dunes.

00:00:15
At the Balancing Ball exhibit, a plastic beach ball floats mysteriously several feet above a large plastic cone. Upon closer inspection, the ball is found to be floating on a stream of air blowing out of the cone; visitors interact with the ball, changing its position in relation to the air flow.