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Edited b-roll of establishing shots, exhibits, and visitors for press use of the new Exploratorium at Pier 15.

Extended raw b-roll of establishing shots, exhibits, and visitors for press use of the new Exploratorium at Pier 15.

This is two minutes of Exploratorium exhibit phenomena B-roll, shot in HD. Exhibit close-up footage includes Light Table, Icy Bodies, and Colored Shadows.

Exhibit Developer Jessica Strick gives us the run-down on how the Exploratorium’s shop keeps humming.

In this historical video from 1996, which was originally made for a museum floor installation, we learn about both the Palace of Fine Arts and the roots of the Exploratorium. This piece mixes footage from films in the Exploratorium's collection and interviews with historians, architects, and museum staff.

In 1997, the Exploratorium opened the Phyllis C. Wattis Webcast Studio on the museum floor, linking Internet users to live museum events and to live events at remote locations. In this video you can explore the early days of webcasting at the Exploratorium.

Riotously colorful bacteria and mobile mosses meet carnivorous plants and rotting carcasses in this impressionistic journey through the Life Sciences area at the Exploratorium.

The Exploratorium is more than a science museum. It is the global leader in informal learning, having spawned 1000 participatory science centers around the world. An estimated 180 million people play with our creations in museums around the globe and online. The Exploratorium is made up of scientists, artists, teachers and tinkerers. It is a public laboratory where visitors are encouraged to ask questions, experiment, and ultimately see the world a little differently.

Edward O. Wilson has revolutionized science and inspired the public more often than any other living biologist. Now he is blending his pioneer work on ants with a new perspective on human development to propose a radical reframing of how evolution works. Dr. Wilson visited the Exploratorium recently and spoke to staff and a group of invited students.

There are green sea turtles in San Diego Bay? Where did they come from? Do they really live over 100 years? Why is it important for scientists to keep track of these giant creatures, and how on earth do they do it? In this interview with ecologist Tomoharu Eguchi (NOAA Marine Fisheries Service) and ecology graduate student Sheila Madrak, we meet the sea turtles and explore these 'big' questions.