Exploratorium home Exploratorium home Explo.tv
Browse programs by:
Search 
00:01:15
Bears lumber across a pristine landscape in remote Kamchatka, Russia.

00:00:25
Discovered just 60 years ago, this remote valley in Russia is a treasure trove for scientists studying microorganisms that survive under extreme conditions.

00:01:25
Tour the lab tent where scientists study the unique microbiology and geochemistry of the hot springs of Russia's Uzon Caldera.

00:04:24
Two Russian scientists--geologist Gennady Karpov and microbiologist Elizaveta Bonch-Osmolovskaya--discuss the unique volcanic features of the Uzon Caldera, the life forms living in the hot springs there, and the important questions they raise.

00:05:16
This clip introduces the 2006 expedition to remote Kamchatka, Russia. Twenty scientists arrive via helicopter to study the unique microbiology and geochemistry of the hot springs of the Uzon Caldera. Microorganisms that can survive the scalding temperatures and acidity in the springs are called extremophiles, and understanding these organisms helps answer questions about the origin and evolution of life on earth.

00:43:41
Join us as we talk with Jill Tarter, Director of the Center for SETI Research and the inspiration behind Jody Foster's character in the movie Contact. Find out about the tools and technologies being developed for a multigenerational effort to search for life on other planets.

00:32:24
Chris McKay, Planetary Scientist at the NASA Ames Research Center, has traveled the world seeking Mars-like environments. In the Dry Valleys of Antarctica—his favorite Mars analog on Earth—Dr. McKay discovered a kind of algae living inside rocks porous to light and water. He’ll show us some of these rocks and talk about the physical conditions required for life.

00:37:45
Jonathan Trent, Astrobiologist, NASA Ames Research Center studies "thermophiles," heat-loving microbes inhabiting places once thought too hostile for life, but analogous to environments that might be found on other planets. He discovered that some of these microbes make a protein that appears to stabilize their cell membranes (and may have applications for nanotechnology).