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00:04:17
The Exploratorium’s new home has an ace up its sleeve for the next big earthquake—a single seismic joint, 300 feet long and two feet wide, will isolate the entire pier structure from the rest of San Francisco. Watch here as the bulkhead at Pier 15 is readied for the installation of the seismic joint.

00:28:00
In this historical video from 1996, which was originally made for a museum floor installation, we learn about both the Palace of Fine Arts and the roots of the Exploratorium. This piece mixes footage from films in the Exploratorium's collection and interviews with historians, architects, and museum staff.

00:08:22
In 1997, the Exploratorium opened the Phyllis C. Wattis Webcast Studio on the museum floor, linking Internet users to live museum events and to live events at remote locations. In this video you can explore the early days of webcasting at the Exploratorium.

00:02:48
Riotously colorful bacteria and mobile mosses meet carnivorous plants and rotting carcasses in this impressionistic journey through the Life Sciences area at the Exploratorium.

00:01:56
At our last After Dark in our current home, the theme was Mars! On display the museum has a full-scale model of the Mars rover Curiosity, which arrived on the red planet Sunday, August 5. At After Dark, we had Martians, robots, and extraterrestrials in the crowd! There were Martian themed lectures, a live webcast, and activities like the Egg Drop, where visitors practiced landing a homemade Rover safely onto the ground. Red skies at night offer fun and delight.

00:30:00
Tardigrades are amazing creatures that can withstand the most extreme conditions on Earth, as well as the vacuum of space! This unique and charismatic animal has the ability to survive in a variety of situations. In today's program, Exploratorium scientist Karen Kalumuck will continue our programming about life in extreme environments as it relates to the search for 'habitability' on Mars.

00:30:00
In today's program, Exploratorium scientists Paul Doherty and Karen Kalumuck will look at examples of life in extreme environments on Earth. As Mars is an extreme environment, the question remains-could it have supported any form of microbial life?

00:43:41
How do you work with a robot millions of miles away to make scientific discoveries on a planet you've never set foot on? How do scientists and engineers begin to "see like a rover"- and what can this tell us about who we are as meaning-making creatures? Find out how, by studying the team behind the rover mission, we learn about more than just the surface of Mars.

00:30:00
Why is water, or evidence of water, so important to the Mars missions? Join Exploratorium scientists Ron Hipschman and Karen Kalumuck as they examine water as one of the building blocks for life and what previous Mars missions have discovered about water on the red planet.

00:41:53
What would it be like on Mars? Get a sense of Martian living with Exploratorium scientist Paul Doherty. He'll introduce the capabilities of the new rover and demonstrate what the planet would look, smell, and feel like to someone on the ground. Learn how things would fall, how they'd burn, and the shape a Martian snowflake should take in a snowstorm.