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00:03:53
Join Exploratorium educator Ken Finn as he unlocks the mystery behind the black sand (a.k.a. magnetite) at Ocean Beach. This piece explores the origin of magnetite in the Sierra Nevada mountains, its journey down the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers to the Bay, and the interesting physical properties of this mineral, plus some fun things you can do with it.

00:07:05
Framing of the Exploratorium's Observatory Building, the only completely new construction at at the piers, began in April 2011. Iron workers placed various sizes of steel beams in piles around the concrete base of the Observatory. Then, while a crane raised and held each beam aloft, the workers used metal spikes to line up the holes of the beams and inserted bolts, tightening them down to tie the structure together. Because the Observatory Building is less than two stories tall, the iron workers were allowed to shimmy across the beams without harnesses. Once this process was finished, the beams were plumbed and welded together.

00:03:16
In January and February of 2011, the first of the large 72" in diameter piles were driven 160 feet in to the sea floor at Piers 15 and 17 in San Francisco, the new home of the Exploratorium. These new piles were installed between the two piers and along the south apron of Pier 15. In early March, the steel casings were filled with concrete.

00:03:18
Construction at the Exploratorium's new home on the Embarcadero began in October 2010. Over a three day span in November 2010, the existing non-historic connector building on the east end of Piers 15 and 17 was demolished, revealing for the first time in 55 years a view out to the Bay.

00:02:20
The Exploratorium celebrated its future home at Piers 15 and 17 in San Francisco with an official groundbreaking ceremony and festivities on October 19, 2010.

00:03:11
This video includes interviews with Exploratorium Executive Director Dr. Dennis Bartels and Exploratorium Chairman of the Board George Cogan about Piers 15 and 17, as well as a fly-through animation of the future home of the Exploratorium.

00:00:36
See slow-motion footage of flames licking through ice during a demonstration by Eric Muller of the Exploratorium's Teacher Institute. Can you guess what he added to the bottom of the vessel before lighting it?

00:09:29
Newton���s laws were never so tasty. Exploratorium staff educator Don Rathjen demonstrates concepts about force using a file folder and a marshmallow.

00:00:40
An introduction to the stripped-down motor, a simple and easy-to-make version of the electric motors found in toys, tools, and appliances.

00:01:16
A detailed description of the simple materials needed to make a stripped-down motor.