Exploratorium home Exploratorium home Explo.tv
Browse programs by:
Search 
00:00:24
The Jakobshavn Isbrae is among the fastest-moving glaciers in the world. The Jakobshavn is an outlet glacier, one of the few places where the giant Greenland ice sheet can shed ice in the form of gigantic icebergs. This timelapse video by Jason Amundson of the University of Alaska Fairbanks shows one of these massive calving events. Notice the dark blue ice that surfaces when the iceberg flips over in the ice-choked Ilulissat icefjord.

00:41:16
The South Pole Telescope captured its first light on Feb. 16, 2007! Join Exploratorium host Mary Miller as she talks with scientists at the South Pole and finds out more about life at the Pole.

00:35:47
Join us as we talk to South Pole scientists about Ice Cube, a major new telescope being built deep below the surface to detect ghostly neutrino particles. The neutrino telescope will use thousands of detectors spread over a square kilometer of ice below the South Pole to study cosmological mysteries such as black holes, gamma ray bursts, and the remnants of supernova explosions.

00:04:34
Check out this amazing footage of how scientists drop detectors miles into the ice to search for elusive neutrinos.

00:10:32
Join Senior Scientist Paul Doherty as he explains the difference between floating ice and land ice, and why they effect sea levels differently.

00:07:54
Join Senior Scientist Paul Doherty as shows how to melt ice unbelievably fast!

00:16:25
Join Exploratorium staff as they give the quick answers to the most frequently asked questions about global warming: What is a "tipping point"? What are carbon credits? What is carbon neutral? What can I do? What can my kid do?

00:38:53
Join us as we talk to scientists from the ANDRILL (ANtarctica DRILLing) project, who are currently on a geological drilling expedition in Antarctica.

00:07:53
Exploratorium Producer Mary Miller chats with Marika Holland, Climate Modeler for the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Dr. Holland co-authored a recent study projecting that the summer Arctic sea ice could completely disappear by 2040.

00:07:18
Join Mary Miller in conversation with Mark Serreze, Senior Research Scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center, as they discuss recent dramatic decreases in Arctic sea ice and what that means for global climate stability.