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00:50:00
Cheryl E. Leonard is a composer, performer, and instrument builder who creates instruments from unusual raw materials—everything from glass shards and pinecones to glaciers and box springs. Here she performs Selections from Antarctica: Music from the Ice with Phillip Greelief, as part of the Exploratorium’s Resonance series.

00:12:21
Musician and comedian Reggie Watts improvises in the Sound Column at the Exploratorium's former home using only his voice and a looping machine.

00:00:30
Two different views–one for each eye–create a 3-D image. Like your own two eyes, the two video cameras atop the screen are separated by a short distance. Both views are projected simultaneously onto the screen. Come play at the Exploratorium! Now open at Pier 15 in San Francisco.

01:00:00
Cheer on the competitors in this zany science cook-off, where teachers compete before a live webcast audience for the sought-after title, "Iron Science Teacher."

00:09:30
There’s no mistaking the distinct voice—whether throbbing, singing, or screaming—of an electric guitar. How does one instrument produce so many different sounds? We visit with Bay Area electric guitarists Ava Mendoza and Henry Kaiser, plus Subway Guitars’ very own Fat Dog, to explore the components of this versatile instrument, getting down to pick-ups, “pots,” and pedals that make it sing.

00:08:22
In 1997, the Exploratorium opened the Phyllis C. Wattis Webcast Studio on the museum floor, linking Internet users to live museum events and to live events at remote locations. In this video you can explore the early days of webcasting at the Exploratorium.

16:54:00
Exploratorium composer Wayne Grim used the video of the transit to create a sound composition in real time. As the video signal was received by Wayne's computer, a program he wrote converted the signal into a unique aural experience. http://www.waynegrim.com

00:02:00
Watch the beginning of Venus’s transit across the disk of the sun, one of the rarest astronomical events.

00:02:00
Watch the conclusion of Venus’s 6.5-hour journey across the disk of the sun, one of the rarest astronomical events.

00:05:09
In this age of iPods and MP3s, the vinyl record (still) stands as an object of curiosity and ongoing admiration. What’s the real difference between a 78 and a 45? Why do they call it “cutting a record” when an album is recorded? Music enthusiast Wade Wright of San Francisco takes us back in time to explain the history and technology of vinyl records.