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00:02:29
Music is more than meets the ears directly. Just as no sound exists in a vacuum, every space sculpts the sound within it. Like a site-specific equalizer, reflections, absorption, and resonances combine to give each venue a unique acoustic stamp. A subway tunnel is “live” space, rich with reverberations that trap and reflect sound in a well of hard tile. True to their name, “dead” spaces do nothing: The only sound heard is what travels directly from instrument to ear. An open field is the ultimate dead space. As you follow this wandering riff, listen to the changes wrought by environment. Distance is also a factor here—the sound you hear is recorded from the camera’s vantage. Which spaces sound live? Which sound dead? Do the acoustic changes affect the feeling of the music? Saxophonist Michael Pearce plays with the Highwater Blues Band in the San Francisco Bay Area.

00:55:27
Watch as Exploratorium staff and local teachers compete for the title of Iron Science Teacher. Each contestant has 10 minutes to make a science lesson out of a secret ingredient. In this special Halloween edition, today's secret ingredient is: Plastic Bags!

00:41:34
Produced by students from San Francisco's Aim High Program. Today they ask, how do our ears work? Can we communicate without words? How do whales communicate under water? Why don't bats slam into trees as they fly? Middle school students will interview Exploratorium Educator Ken Finn and Biologist Dr. Karen Kalumuck, plus special surprise guests!

0:55:19
What does it mean to find the Higgs Boson at CERN? Hear how this elusive particle could change our understanding of physics.

1:09:59
Follow CERN's Mission Impossible team as they race against the clock to collect all they need to bring antihydrogen back to CERN's webcast headquarters.

0:41:28
Scientists at CERN in Switzerland explain to the Exploratorium's San Francisco audience why preparing for antimatter experiments is like arranging a marriage.

0:43:07
Making antihydrogen is no easy matter. Researchers at CERN show the Exploratorium's Melissa Alexander and Tom Humphrey where positrons live and how they keep them as cold as deep space.

0:29:09
What is antimatter and why are scientists studying it? How is the world's largest particle accelerator constructed? The Exploratorium's Rob Semper talks about how science is done at CERN and answers questions about antimatter from the Exploratorium's Webcast audience.

0:29:52
A behind-the-scenes look at how the world's only antimatter factory works, complete with live footage from CERN and a virtual reality tour of the antimatter decelerator. In this Webcast, Rob Semper and Ron Hipschman talk with Melissa Alexander and Thomas Humphrey, who join them virtually from Switzerland.

1:58:50
This episode of Sedge Thomson's West Coast Live radio show explores the places where science and entertainment intersect. In this broadcast: Singer-songwriter John Gorka; Bert Grant, founder of Grant's Brewery; a view from the studio of artist Meredith Tromble; author of "Fisherman's Son" Michael Koepf.