Exploratorium home Exploratorium home Explo.tv
Browse programs by:
Search 
00:07:05
Framing of the Exploratorium's Observatory Building, the only completely new construction at at the piers, began in April 2011. Iron workers placed various sizes of steel beams in piles around the concrete base of the Observatory. Then, while a crane raised and held each beam aloft, the workers used metal spikes to line up the holes of the beams and inserted bolts, tightening them down to tie the structure together. Because the Observatory Building is less than two stories tall, the iron workers were allowed to shimmy across the beams without harnesses. Once this process was finished, the beams were plumbed and welded together.

00:04:15
In this program we meet Elizabeth Young, pigeon rescue expert and head of the pigeon rescue organization MickCoo (http://www.mickacoo.org), for a personal introduction to pigeons-their history, their accomplishments, their contributions to research in animal behavior/memory/learning/and how they navigate long distances-as well as their plight in the city. For more information visit: www.RescueReport.org

00:05:46
Come out to play on the concrete slides at Seward Street Mini Park in the Castro. A series of speed tests guided by physicist Paul Doherty takes on the question asked by sliders everywhere: How can I go faster?

00:03:16
In January and February of 2011, the first of the large 72" in diameter piles were driven 160 feet in to the sea floor at Piers 15 and 17 in San Francisco, the new home of the Exploratorium. These new piles were installed between the two piers and along the south apron of Pier 15. In early March, the steel casings were filled with concrete.

00:03:18
Construction at the Exploratorium's new home on the Embarcadero began in October 2010. Over a three day span in November 2010, the existing non-historic connector building on the east end of Piers 15 and 17 was demolished, revealing for the first time in 55 years a view out to the Bay.

00:05:26
The ground under our San Franciscan feet is constantly on the move. Join Exploratorium educator Ken Finn as we visit some spots around town where exposed rocks reveal the tale of an active earth.

00:06:18
If you sink it, they will come. That’s what Exploratorium biologist Karen Kalumuck learned when she decided to experiment by submerging PVC plates under the piers at Marina Harbor. In this program, you'll meet the bizarre aquatic life forms that inhabit our Bay.

San Francisco's meteorological landscape is as unique as its social landscape. Tune in as we investigate why our city has many microclimates.

00:05:08
Annette Young Smith, along with her neighbors, transformed a littered patch of grass and weeds on a median strip in San Francisco's Bayview District into a lush neighborhood garden full of decorative and edible plants.

00:53:00
A discussion about the artistic, scientific, and moral interpretations of J. Robert Oppenheimer and his legacy as the father of the atomic bomb. Composer John Adams and librettist Peter Sellars of the Doctor Atomic opera are joined by Richard Rhodes, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning book, The Making of the Atomic Bomb. Kip Cranna, musical administrator at the San Francisco Opera, moderates.