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00:37:18
It's time for a new mission to Mars! Join Exploratorium science educators as we celebrate the launch of the newest rover, Curiosity, as it begins it's 8 1/2 month journey to the planet Mars. We will look at the launch itself, talk a little bit about MSL(Mars Science Laboratory) and Curiosity, summarize the history of Mars exploration, and look forward to what is next!

01:23
In this short interview with Dan Goods, designer, artist, and visual strategist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Goods discusses his art piece, "Jupiter Fog Pool." The piece, inspired by the Juno mission to Jupiter, was part of "Cosmological Constructs," our After Dark event of September 2010.

00:11:07
NPR, or Neighborhood Public Radio is an artists collective and community radio project founded in 2004 by multimedia artists and educators Lee Montgomery, Jon Brumit and Michael Trigilio. Acting as a traveling band of guerilla broadcasters, NPR personnel have hosted thematic broadcasts from San Francisco to Serbia, including a stint at the 2008 Whitney Biennial. What is Neighborhood Public Radio? Imagine a storefront community radio station open to you. You get access to the airwaves regardless of your qualifications or message. We caught up with the founders of the now-decentralized NPR team, in Oakland, Chicago and San Diego to talk about the technical, social and political aspects of broadcasting, and about their tattoos. As a special treat for our listeners we thought it would be fun to ask Lee, Jon and Michael to create a new Audio-Art piece for our Podcast series. The idea was simple. They would each create a composition that was no more than 5 minutes long, and we would layer all three parts together to create a single new work. Visit the link at the bottom to hear the results.

00:53:51
On May 11, 2009, the space shuttle Atlantis was launched from the Kennedy Space Center and docked with the Hubble Space Telescope 360 miles above the earth. During Servicing Mission 4 (SM4), astronauts installed new, cutting-edge scientific instruments and replaced gyroscopes, batteries, and other equipment. After a difficult but very successful upgrade of the telescope, the astronauts released Hubble on May 19. The Exploratorium Webcast team will bring you two live Webcasts (May 20 & May 23) about this arduous mission and the future of the telescope.

00:32:23
On May 11, 2009, the space shuttle Atlantis was launched from the Kennedy Space Center and docked with the Hubble Space Telescope 360 miles above the earth. During Servicing Mission 4 (SM4), astronauts installed new, cutting-edge scientific instruments and replaced gyroscopes, batteries, and other equipment. After a difficult but very successful upgrade of the telescope, the astronauts released Hubble on May 19. The Exploratorium Webcast team will bring you two live Webcasts (May 20 & May 23) about this arduous mission and the future of the telescope.

00:15:33
UC Berkeley astrophysicist Bill Holzapfel takes us on a tour of the South Pole Telescope and explains how it is unlocking the secrets of the Universe.

00:27:26
The Mars Phoenix Lander will have been collecting data and sending it back to earth for a month! Exploratorium Senior Scientist Paul Doherty will examine the data and tell us what new information we've gained about Mars. We'll also get an update on our old friends, the Mars rovers Spirit and Opportunity!

00:28:34
Learn more about the new mission to Mars! The Mars Phoenix Lander touched down on the Red Planet on Sunday, May 25, 2008, and began collecting data. Phoenix is designed to study the history of water and search for complex organic molecules in the Martian arctic's ice-rich soil. Join Exploratorium Senior Scientist Paul Doherty as he walks us through the mission and shows us the first pictures that the Phoenix Lander sends back!

00:06:12
This machinima, a movie made entirely within Second Life (a 3-D virtual world), shows a simulation of the impact of a meteor on the surface of Mars.

00:29:28
Scientist working on the South Pole Telescope explain data collection, focusing on the telescope's receiver, a precise instrument with a thousand "eyes" pointed to the distant universe.