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01:040:1
As part of the ECHO Climate Change Symposium, join artist Xavier Cortada as he discusses some ways that the world is participating in actions around climate change.

01:18:49
Join the ECHO Climate Change Symposium as it examines the impacts of climate change across America. The panelists in this discussion will include: Ku’ulei Rogers, Tim Churchill, David Welty, and Jeff Williams.

0032:48
Join the Echo Climate Change Symposium for a panel discussion in which the panelists will share an overview of the impacts of climate change. The panelists will include Glenn Sheehan, Tim Churchill, and Jeff Williams.

00:45:47
Join panelists Richard Glenn, Jim Leavitt, and others to discuss the impact of climate change on Arctic Ecosystems and Populations

00:02:43
Musk oxen graze on a rock ledge outside the town of Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. (No audio attached).

00:00:45
The Jakobshavn Isbræ is among the fastest-moving glaciers in the world. The Jakobshavn is an outlet glacier, one of the few places where the giant Greenland ice sheet can shed ice in the form of gigantic icebergs. This timelapse video (60x real-time speed) from glaciologist Mark Fahnestock shows one of these massive calving events. Notice the dark blue ice that surfaces when the iceberg flips over in the ice-choked Ilulissat icefjord.

00:02:14
While hiking back from a research site near Kangerlussuaq, Greenland, Ice Stories correspondent Billy D'Andrea happened upon a Peregrine Falcon scrape. Two falcons, not too thrilled that he was passing by their cliff-side nest, began circling and screaming to chase him off. In this video, listen for the sound of Wheatears (songbirds) chirping and yipping in the foreground.

00:04:22
Meet Dr. Ethan Brodsky from the U. of Wisconsin, who advised a group of undergraduate students in the design and build of an electric snowmobile. Video produced by Ice Stories correspondent Zoe Courville.

00:03:18
Dr. Bart Kempenaers, a behavioral ecologist from the Max Planck Institiute of Ornithology in Seewiesen, Germany, and his team fashion fake Sandpiper eggs, swap them for the real ones in the nest and incubate them in their lab at BASC’s (Barrow Arctic Science Consortium) new research facility. Once the hatchlings emerge, they take samples from them to determine factors such as paternity. The chicks are then returned to the nest, without the mother batting a feather.