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00:03:53
Join Exploratorium educator Ken Finn as he unlocks the mystery behind the black sand (a.k.a. magnetite) at Ocean Beach. This piece explores the origin of magnetite in the Sierra Nevada mountains, its journey down the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers to the Bay, and the interesting physical properties of this mineral, plus some fun things you can do with it.

This magical piece integrates live performance and projected animation. As artist Miwa Matreyek moves behind the screen, her shadow becomes the protagonist in a fantastical world of her own creation.

00:01:27
Would you drink from a water fountain fashioned from an actual (but unused!) toilet? Watch museum visitors experience the tension between reason and emotion while playing with this unusual Mind area exhibit, aptly named "Sip of Conflict."

00:04:23
Ken Murphy, creator of A History of the Sky— a time-lapse visualization that will span an entire year—talks about his project during the After Dark event, Resolution.

00:17:15
Join exhibit developer Charles Sowers as he demonstrates Watch Water Freeze, an exhibit designed to encourage noticing. Patience with this piece is rewarded with breathtaking patterns of ice crystals. Viewed through a polarizing filter, the beautiful colors and crystalline structures of Watch Water Freeze have inspired countless museum visitors to reach for their cameras.

00:00:36
See slow-motion footage of flames licking through ice during a demonstration by Eric Muller of the Exploratorium's Teacher Institute. Can you guess what he added to the bottom of the vessel before lighting it?

00:00:59
Exhibit developer Erik Thogersen backs away from the Giant Mirror. Watch his image change as he passes through the focal point, then continues on past the center of curvature.

00:04:53
At the Giant Mirror, Senior Staff Scientist Paul Doherty demonstrates a simple way of locating a real image—an image that floats in space in front of the mirror.

00:04:49
Senior Staff Scientist Thomas Humphrey invents a simple experiment to see if the Giant Mirror is spherical or parabolic, and then to see if it's perfectly spherical. By placing a Styrofoam ball at the center of curvature, he's able to prove that the mirror is out of pure sphericity by about one-quarter of one degree.

00:04:37
Staff Neuroscientist Richard Brown demonstrates that the Giant Mirror reflects infrared radiation as well as visible light.