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00:47:47
Cheer on the competitors in this zany science cook-off, where teachers compete before a live webcast audience for the sought-after title, "Iron Science Teacher." This week's secret ingredient? Colors!

01:00
Join us for a preview of Oaxacan artisans that will be visiting the Exploratorium this summer as part of Colorfest!

00:04:55
XTech at the Exploratorium empowers high school students through the practical use of Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Mathematics. Students develop skills - designing and building, creating media, and facilitating community education events - that will lead them into college and beyond. In this show, we will be investigating color. There are colors all around us. Join us and explore the relationship between color and light. Watch as we create colored shadows and trick your mind with colors.

00:00:59
Exploratorium Senior Scientist Paul Doherty explains a double rainbow sighting at Burning Man 2010!

01:23
In this short interview with Dan Goods, designer, artist, and visual strategist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Goods discusses his art piece, "Jupiter Fog Pool." The piece, inspired by the Juno mission to Jupiter, was part of "Cosmological Constructs," our After Dark event of September 2010.

00:07:04
What is indigo anyway? Staff physicist Paul Doherty tells the story behind ROYGBIV, and how he'd like to change that standard palette.

00:05:20
Exploratorium staff physicist Thomas Humphrey explains what temperature and color have to do with one another.

00:04:51
A detailed demonstration of how to do the Color Chromatography activity, which lets you see the colors hidden in black ink. Includes a discussion of materials needed.

00:01:12
An introduction to an activity that lets you discover the secret colors hidden in black ink. With a paper towel, a black marker, and a cup of water, create a rainbow of colors while exploring capillary action and chromatography.

00:01:33
Explore the science behind this activity, including capillary action (how the water moves up the paper) and chromatography, or how different elements of the ink are carried along at different rates, allowing you to see that black ink is actually made up of many different colors.