Exploratorium home Exploratorium home Explo.tv
Browse programs by:
Search 
00:29:33
Join Exploratorium biologist Karen Kalumuck as she investigates the characteristics of living organisms and ecosystems, and how climate change affects them.

1:16:37
On March 29, 2006, a total solar eclipse occurred as the moon moved directly between the earth and the sun. The moon's shadow fell on the earth, first darkening the eastern tip of Brazil, and then moved across the Atlantic Ocean to make landfall in Ghana, Africa. It continued moving northeast through Nigeria, Niger, Libya, Egypt, across the Mediterranean and into Turkey, where an Exploratorium team was waiting.

2:53:54
A telescope-only view of the 2006 eclipse, as seen from Turkey.

00:04:12
McMurdo Station is the American staging area for Antarctic research. At the edge of Ross Island, off the coast of the continent, a small town of workeres feeds, houses, prepared, supplies, fuels, transports, and protects those who conduct field research throughout Antarctica and the surrounding waters. The community numbers 1,000 in the summer and 200 in the winter. And the community has a garden, from which they obtain their only fresh produce. Many love to visit this polar paradise.

00:04:57
McMurdo Station is the American staging area for Antarctic research. At the edge of Ross Island, off the coast of the continent, a small town of workeres feeds, houses, prepared, supplies, fuels, transports, and protects those who conduct field research throughout Antarctica and the surrounding waters. The community numbers 1,000 in the summer and 200 in the winter. And the community has a garden. But they aren't allowed to use soil.

02:03:07
Celebrate the spring equinox at the Mayan ruins of Chichén Itzá, in the state of Yucatan, Mexico. The alignment of the sun on this day creates the appearance of a shadow, in the form of a serpent, that descends the main staircase of the great pyramid. The Live@Exploratorium crew is there to capture the snake on film and to speak with local archaeologists, archeoastronomers, and solar scientists about this amazing phenomenon.

00:32:24
Chris McKay, Planetary Scientist at the NASA Ames Research Center, has traveled the world seeking Mars-like environments. In the Dry Valleys of Antarctica—his favorite Mars analog on Earth—Dr. McKay discovered a kind of algae living inside rocks porous to light and water. He’ll show us some of these rocks and talk about the physical conditions required for life.

00:37:45
Jonathan Trent, Astrobiologist, NASA Ames Research Center studies "thermophiles," heat-loving microbes inhabiting places once thought too hostile for life, but analogous to environments that might be found on other planets. He discovered that some of these microbes make a protein that appears to stabilize their cell membranes (and may have applications for nanotechnology).

00:32:56
Nathalie Cabrol, Planetary Scientist, Principal Investigator at NASA Ames Research Center and the SETI Institute, looks for Mars analogs in extreme environments on Earth. She found one at the world’s highest lake at Chile’s Licancabur volcano, site of a unique analog to ancient Martian lakes. We chat with Dr. Cabrol as she investigates the life forms at Licancabur.

00:10:19
Join the Exploratorium's Dr. Paul Doherty as he visits a "sculpture to observe the stars" in northern New Mexico, where the Sangre de Cristo Mountains meet the eastern plains. There artist Charles Ross is creating an art installation that is also a star observatory. This major earthwork has two main elements: the Star Tunnel, which allows you to walk through the entire history of the earth's changing alignment to our North Star, Polaris; and the Solar Pyramid, where one can visually experience an hour of the earth's rotation.