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00:04:16
Just outside the hum and buzz of San Francisco, there's a hum and buzz of a different sort. It's the sound of thousands of acres of almond crops being pollinated by bees—bees in such demand that they must be trucked in from as far as Texas. Almond grower Dave Phippen explains why. keeping this winged labor force happy and healthy is a vital but tricky business.

00:05:46
Come out to play on the concrete slides at Seward Street Mini Park in the Castro. A series of speed tests guided by physicist Paul Doherty takes on the question asked by sliders everywhere: How can I go faster?

00:03:16
In January and February of 2011, the first of the large 72" in diameter piles were driven 160 feet in to the sea floor at Piers 15 and 17 in San Francisco, the new home of the Exploratorium. These new piles were installed between the two piers and along the south apron of Pier 15. In early March, the steel casings were filled with concrete.

02:50
Josh Short from the Cardboard Institute of Technology walks us through their latest installation, Subterrain, on the Exploratorium floor!

00:01:10
This After Dark event was devoted to the ever-mysterious and otherworldly dimensions of sleep, darkness, and night.

00:05:00
A short video created about an iconic exhibit at the Exploratorium, Ned Kahn's Chaotic Pendulum. An apparently simple set of pendulums is given an initial twist. Intuition says that the resulting motion of this simple system should be, if not simple, at least predictable. Intuition doesn't work with this device though, and its motion is an extremely complicated, and somewhat whimsical, twisting and turning that defies the predictive powers of physics.

00:03:18
Construction at the Exploratorium's new home on the Embarcadero began in October 2010. Over a three day span in November 2010, the existing non-historic connector building on the east end of Piers 15 and 17 was demolished, revealing for the first time in 55 years a view out to the Bay.

00:04:07
Twenty-seven miles beyond the Golden Gate, the craggy Farallon Islands have been home to fur-seal hunters from Russia, a gold-rush-era egg business, and even a nuclear waste dump. Today they’re home to 250,000 sea birds, not to mention seals, sea lions, whales, and sharks. What makes these stark-looking islands so attractive to wildlife?

00:03:21
This After Dark event, which explored the science behind slowing down, included artist Joe Mangrum, who created a sand mandala on the floor of the museum. In this timelapse video, shot over 8 hours, you can see the full arc of the work.

00:05:26
The ground under our San Franciscan feet is constantly on the move. Join Exploratorium educator Ken Finn as we visit some spots around town where exposed rocks reveal the tale of an active earth.