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0:41:28
Scientists at CERN in Switzerland explain to the Exploratorium's San Francisco audience why preparing for antimatter experiments is like arranging a marriage.

0:43:07
Making antihydrogen is no easy matter. Researchers at CERN show the Exploratorium's Melissa Alexander and Tom Humphrey where positrons live and how they keep them as cold as deep space.

0:29:09
What is antimatter and why are scientists studying it? How is the world's largest particle accelerator constructed? The Exploratorium's Rob Semper talks about how science is done at CERN and answers questions about antimatter from the Exploratorium's Webcast audience.

0:29:52
A behind-the-scenes look at how the world's only antimatter factory works, complete with live footage from CERN and a virtual reality tour of the antimatter decelerator. In this Webcast, Rob Semper and Ron Hipschman talk with Melissa Alexander and Thomas Humphrey, who join them virtually from Switzerland.

0:01:01
On November 15th, 1999, for the first time in 25 years, the planet Mercury passed between us (in the western hemisphere) and the sun--an event known as a "transit." Here is one of five short streaming videos detailing the event.

0:02:02
On November 15th, 1999, for the first time in 25 years, the planet Mercury passed between us (in the western hemisphere) and the sun--an event known as a "transit." Here is one of five short streaming videos detailing the event.

0:01:01
On November 15th, 1999, for the first time in 25 years, the planet Mercury passed between us (in the western hemisphere) and the sun--an event known as a "transit." Here is one of five short streaming videos detailing the event.

0:02:02
On November 15th, 1999, for the first time in 25 years, the planet Mercury passed between us (in the western hemisphere) and the sun--an event known as a "transit." Here is one of five short streaming videos detailing the event.

0:02:02
On November 15th, 1999, for the first time in 25 years, the planet Mercury passed between us (in the western hemisphere) and the sun--an event known as a "transit." Here is one of five short streaming videos detailing the event.

2:00:05
On August 11, 1999, 3:00 a.m. Pacific Standard Time, the Exploratorium presented a live Webcast of a total solar eclipse that passed across Europe and Asia. The program included direct satellite communication with our expedition team, reporting from a crowded square in Amasya, Turkey, a town along the path of totality.