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00:16:56
How does the interaction of solar radiation on sea ice effect climate change? Please join us as we chat live with Dr. Don Perovich, an expert in the fields of albedo effect, and sea-ice mass balance on climate.

00:29:28
Scientist working on the South Pole Telescope explain data collection, focusing on the telescope's receiver, a precise instrument with a thousand "eyes" pointed to the distant universe.

00:31:32
Learn about the various projects and teams of people working on the South Pole Telescope.

00:26:39
What have scientists learned from the South Pole Telescope so far, and what work needs to be done this year as the scientists fine-tune this amazing new piece of technology?

00:03:24
What is dark energy? Cosmologist Rocky Kolb explains how the South Pole Telescope will help us understand the properties and nature of this mysterious force.

00:26:04
Want to get off the grid but think it’s just too expensive? UCB's Dr. Jeff Grossman explains how nanotechnology may be used to make solar panels cheaper. We’ll also hear from philosopher Patrick Lin of the Nanoethics Group about ethical dilemmas that crop up when we try to improve our lives through nanotechnology.

00:31:36
The two Mars Rovers are alive and well after surviving their second Martian winter. Come and see photos of discoveries they made during their third year on Mars, with Exploratorium Senior Scientist Paul Doherty.

00:41:16
The South Pole Telescope captured its first light on Feb. 16, 2007! Join Exploratorium host Mary Miller as she talks with scientists at the South Pole and finds out more about life at the Pole.

00:15:00
Mary Miller chats with scientists at the South Pole about the nearly-completed telescope. The satellite connection to the pole deteriorated quickly, and we hope to repeat this program in the near future. Stay tuned for updates!

00:35:47
Join us as we talk to South Pole scientists about Ice Cube, a major new telescope being built deep below the surface to detect ghostly neutrino particles. The neutrino telescope will use thousands of detectors spread over a square kilometer of ice below the South Pole to study cosmological mysteries such as black holes, gamma ray bursts, and the remnants of supernova explosions.