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00:04:52
Newton wasn’t really ready to believe that light was a wave, and so he didn’t see what was in front of his eyes. Staff physicist Paul Doherty tells how to do the same experiment that Newton did back in the 1650s to see the wave nature of light.

Most things won't burn on Mars—after all, the main ingredient in the Martian atmosphere, carbon dioxide, is used in fire extinguishers on earth. So how would one create fire without oxygen? Use metal!This slow motion footage shows magnesium burning within a block of dry ice.

00:04:37
Staff Neuroscientist Richard Brown demonstrates that the Giant Mirror reflects infrared radiation as well as visible light.

00:16:24
In conjunction with this summer's special exhibition Reflections, Exploratorium Senior Scientist Paul Doherty joins us for a hands-on Webcast. What effect does looking through two mirrors have on an image? Or three mirrors?

00:31:36
The two Mars Rovers are alive and well after surviving their second Martian winter. Come and see photos of discoveries they made during their third year on Mars, with Exploratorium Senior Scientist Paul Doherty.

00:37:45
What's Christmas like at the South Pole? Also learn about the Race Around the World and the installation of the telescope's new receiver.

00:11:46
Join Senior Scientist Paul Doherty as he measures the power used by two lightbulbs--one incandescent and one fluorescent--that make the same amount of light.

00:48:31
A century after publication of Einstein's famous papers on light and relativity, this most celebrated of Nobel Laureates will be the subject of a talk by award-winning science writer K.C. Cole. She'll discuss the ways in which Einstein continues to influence physics today, from detecting gravity waves to understanding string theory.

1:02:13
In this zany competition teachers will have ten minutes to create a science activity from a special St. Patrick's Day secret ingredient-things that are green!

00:47:21
On December 11, 2005, Opportunity, one of the twin rovers exploring Mars, celebrated its first Martian birthday. Opportunity had been on the red planet 687 Earth days, which is one Martian year. (A year is the time it takes a planet to make a complete loop around the sun). Join us for a look back over the those 687 days of discovery: what we learned, what we saw, and what questions remained unanswered.