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00:18:34
Dr. Carol Greider is a professor of molecular biology and genetics at Johns Hopkins University. She worked with molecular biologist Elizabeth Blackburn to discover the role of telomeres—segments of DNA that protect and stabilize the ends of chromosomes. Dr. Greider tells us about her work and shares her thoughts about the importance of mentors for women in science.

00:26:05
Dr. Bruce Stillman is the Director of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, a position he inherited from James Watson in 1994. He continues his own research at the lab on DNA replication. In this program, Dr. Stillman describes the unique culture of science at CSHL, explores future directions of research, and tells us what he learned as an administrator for Dr. Watson.

00:52:14
Learn how sparkling wine is made, what makes it different from still wine, and where all those little bubbles come from! We reveal how to open a bottle without touching the cork, as well as the best way to keep the bubbles in the bubbly. Join our special guests, Stanford chemistry professor Dick Zare, and French enologist Michel Salgues, winemaker at Roederer Estates in California, as we explore the science of tiny bubbles.

1:00:24
Why does a turkey continue to cook after it is out of the oven? How can you be sure to thoroughly cook the dark meat without drying out the white meat? Is stuffing really a good idea? Join us as we talk turkey with food expert and author Harold McGee. Discover why temperature is critical, and investigate different cooking methods: roasting, deep frying, barbecuing, and smoking.

00:41:34
Produced by students from San Francisco's Aim High Program. Today they ask, how do our ears work? Can we communicate without words? How do whales communicate under water? Why don't bats slam into trees as they fly? Middle school students will interview Exploratorium Educator Ken Finn and Biologist Dr. Karen Kalumuck, plus special surprise guests!

12:25:46
Why do many things sound different underwater? How are echoes made? Can you feel or see sound? Join us as we delve into the mysteries of sound. This webcast will feature an Aim High student demonstrating how to make a membranophone; Exploratorium physicist Dr. Paul Doherty modeling sound with ringing aluminum rods, corrugated plastic whirlies, and a slinky; and Marco Jordan, lead educator in the Exploratorium's Outreach program, demonstrating sound science with a "whine" glass and a singing bowl.

1:08:10
Watch as Exploratorium staff and local teachers compete for the title of Iron Sscience Teacher. Each contestant has ten minutes to make a science lesson out of a secret ingredient.

0:28:24
Join the Origins team as they travel to Antarctica. We sent Mary, Noel, Paul, and Julie to explore scientific wonders from McMurdo to the Pole. Learn all about the extreme science being conducted at the South Pole in a daily dispatch from Terra Australis Incognita!

0:28:14
Join the Origins team as they travel to Antarctica. We sent Mary, Noel, Paul, and Julie to explore scientific wonders from McMurdo to the Pole. Learn all about the extreme science being conducted at the South Pole in a daily dispatch from Terra Australis Incognita!

0:46:48
In 1963 Benoit Mandelbrot introduced the fractal concept. Fractals are shapes or behaviors that have similar properties at all levels of magnification. Just as the sphere is a concept that unites raindrops, basketballs and Mars, so fractal is a concept that unites clouds, coastlines, plants and strange attractors. Dr. Mandelbrot dropped in for a visit during our 2001 series of webcasts about Antarctica. We took some time out from the freezing cold to interview him.