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00:31:54
After yesterday's historic mission to the surface of Titan, what happens next? What do the new pictures of Saturn's largest moon tell us, and what does it mean for our understanding of earth?

00:28:55
After its long journey to Saturn's largest moon, Titan, the Huygens probe is released from the Cassini spacecraft. The Huygens probe completes its descent to Titan, capturing hundreds of images on its way. Join Senior Scientist Paul Doherty as he gives us background on this incredible mission and sets the stage for the first close-up images of this mysterious moon.

00:26:34
Paul Doherty and Eric Wegryn explore the latest photos of Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, taken from only 750 miles away by the Huygens probe.

00:28:53
Paul Doherty and Ron Hipschman discuss the clouds and atmosphere of Saturn. Learn how to make a cloud in your kitchen or an atmosphere in a soda bottle!

00:27:05
Paul Doherty and Ron Hipschman discuss some of Saturn's interesting history.

00:18:43
Dr. Paul Doherty and Dr. Eric Weygren discuss the most intriguing moon in the Solar System, Titan. Titan is veiled in a mysterious, dense, foggy atmosphere.

00:19:05
Join Exploratorium scientist Dr. Paul Doherty and Dr. Eric Wegryn as they discuss the rings of Saturn and show new images from Cassini.

00:17:32
Look at new images from the moon Phoebe with Exploratorium scientist Dr. Paul Doherty and Dr. Eric Wegryn of Cassini’s VIMS project.

0:15:00
On Thursday, June 21, 2001, a total solar eclipse sped across the Southern Hemisphere. The shadow of the moon first darkened the South Atlantic about 250 miles east of the Uruguay coast. It crossed the Atlantic Ocean, traversed southern Africa and the island of Madagascar, and then vanished into the darkness as night fell over the Indian Ocean. We sent our crew to the country of Zambia to bring images of the total solar eclipse as it happened.

01:00:00
On Thursday, June 21, 2001, a total solar eclipse sped across the Southern Hemisphere. The shadow of the moon first darkened the South Atlantic about 250 miles east of the Uruguay coast. It crossed the Atlantic Ocean, traversed southern Africa and the island of Madagascar, and then vanished into the darkness as night fell over the Indian Ocean. We sent our crew to the country of Zambia to bring images of the total solar eclipse as it happened.