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00:01:36
B-Roll for playback during webcast, "Tundra and Climate Change with Steve Hastings," on 5/24/08. Footage includes shots of data gathering, facilities and landscape at the Barrow Environmental Observatory.

05:12:09
On November 8, 2006, Mercury slowly slid across the face of the sun during a relatively rare event known as a transit. The Exploratorium's Live@ crew was at the Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona to cover the event. This webcast includes a brief history of Kitt Peak and its 21 telescopes.

12:44:38
This special edition of Iron Scence Teacher is part of our celebration of the Teacher Institute's 21st birthday. Watch as the best teachers on the planet battle it out for the title of Iron Science Teacher. In this zany competition teachers will have ten minutes to create a science activity.

00:07:58
How does your eye work? You see the world because light gets into your eyes. Your eye uses that light to make an image of the world inside your eye—just as a camera uses light to make a photograph. At the Exploratorium, we dissect cow eyes to show people how an eye functions, and look at the parts that make up an eye. This video shows and explains a dissection with one of our staff Explainers.

00:59:15
Astronomers in many parts of the world watched as Venus moved across the disk of the Sun, one of the rarest planetary alignments. The Exploratorium webcast this historic event from Greece.

00:10:19
Join the Exploratorium's Dr. Paul Doherty as he visits a "sculpture to observe the stars" in northern New Mexico, where the Sangre de Cristo Mountains meet the eastern plains. There artist Charles Ross is creating an art installation that is also a star observatory. This major earthwork has two main elements: the Star Tunnel, which allows you to walk through the entire history of the earth's changing alignment to our North Star, Polaris; and the Solar Pyramid, where one can visually experience an hour of the earth's rotation.

00:37:05
We stayed up with Exploratorium scientist Ron Hipschman at the Lick Observatory in San Jose, California, for the best view we've had of Mars in a long, long time. At midnight on August 27, Earth and Mars passed closer to one another than they have in 60,000 years. Astronomers were on hand to tell us all about our nearest neighbor—its geography, orbit, and why both NASA and the European Space Agency have chosen this time to launch robotic missions to Mars.

00:09:54
Our team of middle school students from the Aim High program investigates new technologies that use our unique physical traits as tools for identification. Eye-D explores the possibilities of retinal scans.

1:12:03
In a broad-ranging look at the impact of Eames design on contemporary culture, Steve Cabella hosts a discussion with Joseph Rosa, Curator of Architecture and Design at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.