Exploratorium home Exploratorium home Explo.tv
Browse programs by:
Search 
00:00:39
An introduction to the cuica (pronounced KWEE-kah), a small friction drum used in Brazil's Carnival parade.

00:06:39
A detailed demonstration of how to make this small friction drum, including a discussion of materials needed and how different kinds of materials make for cuicas that produce different sounds.

00:01:30
The science behind this musical instrument, including the concepts of sound, vibration, resonance, and amplification.

1:17:34
How do opera singers sing loud enough to be heard over an orchestra? Can an opera singer's voice really break a wine glass? What's the difference between a baritone and a soprano? Discover the answers to these questions—and more!—in this presentation for families. Join physicist and composer Dr. Brian Holmes and San Francisco Opera Center Director Sheri Greenawald to explore how the art and science of singing combine in opera.

1:13:04
Watch as Exploratorium staff and local teachers compete for the title of Iron Science Teacher. Each contestant has 10 minutes to make a science lesson out of a science ingredient. This is a Halloween edition of Iron Science Teacher, and today's secret ingredient is: Bones!

00:19:05
Join Exploratorium scientist Dr. Paul Doherty and Dr. Eric Wegryn as they discuss the rings of Saturn and show new images from Cassini.

00:55:27
Watch as Exploratorium staff and local teachers compete for the title of Iron Science Teacher. Each contestant has 10 minutes to make a science lesson out of a secret ingredient. In this special Halloween edition, today's secret ingredient is: Plastic Bags!

1:20:37
Peer inside the thinking brain, using state-of-the-art functional magnetic resonance imaging. Scientists Gary Glover and John Desmond of the Richard M. Lucas Center for Imaging at Stanford University conduct cognitive tests on an Exploratorium staffer. Imaging tools display the active areas of the brain in real time.

0:01:01
On November 15th, 1999, for the first time in 25 years, the planet Mercury passed between us (in the western hemisphere) and the sun--an event known as a "transit." Here is one of five short streaming videos detailing the event.

0:02:02
On November 15th, 1999, for the first time in 25 years, the planet Mercury passed between us (in the western hemisphere) and the sun--an event known as a "transit." Here is one of five short streaming videos detailing the event.