Exploratorium home Exploratorium home Explo.tv
Browse programs by:
At the Balancing Ball exhibit, a plastic beach ball floats mysteriously several feet above a large plastic cone. Upon closer inspection, the ball is found to be floating on a stream of air blowing out of the cone; visitors interact with the ball, changing its position in relation to the air flow.

Artist Sheldon Brown creates an urban/suburban/rural environment in which the visitor literally "paints" the flying landscape with highways, buildings, and automobiles. This exhibit was part of the Virtual Unreality exhibition.

An clip of the Aeolian Landscape exhibit by artist Ned Kahn. Blowing air sculpts sand into an ever-changing landscape.

The concept of space-time--perhaps Einstein's most fundamental contribution to our understanding of the universe--will be explored using special red lasers.

Using a simple ball-bearing model, Exploratorium Senior Scientist Dr. Paul Doherty demonstrates Brownian Motion and explains how it proves the existence of atoms.

Watch as the best teachers on the planet battle it out for the title of Iron Science Teacher. In this zany competition teachers will have ten minutes to create a science activity. This week’s “secret” ingredient: CD cases!

Watch as Exploratorium staff and local teachers compete for the title of Iron Science Teacher. Each contestant has 10 minutes to make a science lesson out of a science ingredient. This is a Halloween edition of Iron Science Teacher, and today's secret ingredient is: Bones!

Paul Doherty and Ron Hipschman discuss the clouds and atmosphere of Saturn. Learn how to make a cloud in your kitchen or an atmosphere in a soda bottle!

Join Exploratorium scientist Dr. Paul Doherty and Dr. Eric Wegryn as they discuss the rings of Saturn and show new images from Cassini.

Meet Breea Govenar, a biologist at Penn State University, as she speaks to us from aboard a research vessel from Wood's Hole Oceanographic Institute. She'll discuss life near deep-sea thermal vents in the Pacific Ocean. The Webcast also includes Dr. Alissa Arp, a biologist from San Francisco State University studying the tube worms that live around these very hot marine spots.