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00:01:27
The science behind this simple musical instrument, including the concepts of sound, vibration, and amplification.

00:00:39
An introduction to the cuica (pronounced KWEE-kah), a small friction drum used in Brazil's Carnival parade.

00:06:39
A detailed demonstration of how to make this small friction drum, including a discussion of materials needed and how different kinds of materials make for cuicas that produce different sounds.

00:01:30
The science behind this musical instrument, including the concepts of sound, vibration, resonance, and amplification.

00:00:24
An introduction to a crowd-pleasing noisemaker called a sound sandwich, which you can adjust to raise or lower its pitch.

00:02:32
A detailed demonstration of how to make this primitive wind instrument using little more than a straw, two craft sticks, and some rubber bands.

00:01:48
The science behind this instrument, including a discussion of how vibration produces sound, and how long, massive objects vibrate slowly and produce a low-pitched sound, while shorter, less massive objects vibrate quickly and produce a high-pitched sound.

00:43:30
Julia Child and physicist Philip Morrison once cooked up (and sampled) "primordial soup," a mixture of ingredients said to be the materials from which life sprang on Earth. How accurate is this notion? David Deamer studies how some molecules self-assemble into order, and has developed new theories about how life evolved from components on Earth. We’ll talk with him, do hands-on experiments, and watch vintage footage of Julia Child tasting the soup. Guests: David Deamer, Director, UC Berkeley SETI Program, and Karen Kalumuk, Exploratorium staff scientist.

00:55:27
Watch as Exploratorium staff and local teachers compete for the title of Iron Science Teacher. Each contestant has 10 minutes to make a science lesson out of a secret ingredient. In this special Halloween edition, today's secret ingredient is: Plastic Bags!

00:11:16
Our team of middle school students from the Aim High program investigates new technologies that use our unique physical traits as tools for identification. Vox Unlocks tunes into voice recognition