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00:24:00
Cheryl E. Leonard is a composer, performer, and instrument builder who creates instruments from unusual raw materials—everything from glass shards and pinecones to glaciers and box springs. This interview took place at the Exploratorium on October 10, 2013, just prior to her performance of Selections from Antarctica: Music from the Ice with Phillip Greelief.

00:50:00
Cheryl E. Leonard is a composer, performer, and instrument builder who creates instruments from unusual raw materials—everything from glass shards and pinecones to glaciers and box springs. Here she performs Selections from Antarctica: Music from the Ice with Phillip Greelief, as part of the Exploratorium’s Resonance series.

00:12:21
Musician and comedian Reggie Watts improvises in the Sound Column at the Exploratorium's former home using only his voice and a looping machine.

16:54:00
Exploratorium composer Wayne Grim used the video of the transit to create a sound composition in real time. As the video signal was received by Wayne's computer, a program he wrote converted the signal into a unique aural experience. http://www.waynegrim.com

00:32:46
Discover the Tibetan Buddhist view of the mind with Geshe Lhakdor. He discusses how awareness and sensory information (sight, sound, smell, taste, and touch) are perceived through different forms of consciousness, and how Buddhist practitioners investigate their inner mental experiences to better understand their experience of the world around them.

00:05:09
In this age of iPods and MP3s, the vinyl record (still) stands as an object of curiosity and ongoing admiration. What’s the real difference between a 78 and a 45? Why do they call it “cutting a record” when an album is recorded? Music enthusiast Wade Wright of San Francisco takes us back in time to explain the history and technology of vinyl records.

01:23:00
In this gem from 1990, we get a brief peek into the flourishing mind of German-born composer/sculptor Trimpin, a MacArthur "genius" award winner and the subject of a recent feature documentary. He chronicles his unique adventures through sound and music making, takes audience questions, and stages modified versions of his musical installations in front of the live audience.

00:08:39
Geeks have strange hobbies. Staff physicist Paul Doherty plays the corrugated plastic tube, also known as a “whirly,” and explains the surprising science behind the sound.

00:09:39
Exploratorium staff physicist Thomas Humphrey divulges a clever way to measure the speed of sound, and he explains how he’s used that information to measure things in the world.

00:05:23
Our host, Stephanie Chasteen, shares some more fun facts and activities having to do with the science of sound.