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00:06:10
Get to know the grandfather of all instruments, the Pipe Organ. We talked with Schoenstein & Company Organ Builders about the process of designing, constructing, and fine-tuning their instruments.

00:24:00
Cheryl E. Leonard is a composer, performer, and instrument builder who creates instruments from unusual raw materials—everything from glass shards and pinecones to glaciers and box springs. This interview took place at the Exploratorium on October 10, 2013, just prior to her performance of Selections from Antarctica: Music from the Ice with Phillip Greelief.

00:50:00
Cheryl E. Leonard is a composer, performer, and instrument builder who creates instruments from unusual raw materials—everything from glass shards and pinecones to glaciers and box springs. Here she performs Selections from Antarctica: Music from the Ice with Phillip Greelief, as part of the Exploratorium’s Resonance series.

00:12:21
Musician and comedian Reggie Watts improvises in the Sound Column at the Exploratorium's former home using only his voice and a looping machine.

00:01:38
Watch the Exploratorium's construction process from December 2010 to November 2012 in under two minutes. Come see for yourself—doors open at Pier 15 on April 17, 2013. http://press.exploratorium.edu/exploratoriums-net-zero-energy-goal-for-new-waterfront-home-2013/ Images courtesy of Ken Murphy. Music by Wayne Grim.

16:54:00
Exploratorium composer Wayne Grim used the video of the transit to create a sound composition in real time. As the video signal was received by Wayne's computer, a program he wrote converted the signal into a unique aural experience. http://www.waynegrim.com

00:32:46
Discover the Tibetan Buddhist view of the mind with Geshe Lhakdor. He discusses how awareness and sensory information (sight, sound, smell, taste, and touch) are perceived through different forms of consciousness, and how Buddhist practitioners investigate their inner mental experiences to better understand their experience of the world around them.

04:53
How can a wind-powered sailboat move faster than the wind? Why do the America's Cup sails look like airplane wings? With the beginner in mind, Exploratorium senior scientist Paul Doherty introduces the basic physics of sailing and sail design.

00:02:00
See the subtle, mesmeric effects revealed by slow-motion observation of three iconic exhibits: Circling Wave Umbrella, in which spinning fabric forms pockets of swirling air; Rift Zone, a miniature geothermal landscape created by air bubbling through fine sand; and Vortex, a swirling vortex of water in a hydrodynamic dance with gravity.

00:04:22
For John Edmark, geometry is a foundation for creating beauty. Here he explains his interest in unexpected natural phenemona, and how visitors to his kaleidoscopic piece, The Geometron, can turn simple shapes into surprisingly intricate patterns of reflection.