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00:10:24
Exploratorium staff member Earl Stirling demonstrates the amazing "Pyrograph", an artwork refined over four years. Like a fiery version of the museum’s classic Drawing Board, Stirling’s "Pyrograph" swings a pendulum over a sandy cauldron, tracing out oscillating patterns in colorful fire. This mesmerizing piece evokes both the Foucault pendulum and Dante’s Inferno.

00:01:54
This After Dark event featured a special installation of the Cubatron by Bay Area artist and engineer Mark Lottor. A visually stunning favorite of music and art festival audiences, the Cubatron is a 3–D light sculpture made from 8–x–8-foot modular cubes, each containing 1,000 individually programmable RGB LEDs. Viewed from any direction—even underneath—the Cubatron’s thousands of programmed pixels paint exquisite arrays of color that cascade in spectacularly dynamic patterns.

00:25:13
Have you ever wondered exactly what clouds are made of, or what the difference is between a cumulus and lenticular cloud? Clouds are an ever-present, ever-changing part of our natural landscape. They come in a huge variety of shapes and sizes, and capture our imagination with their endless permutations. Join Exploratorium Senior Scientist Paul Doherty for a live Webcast about cloud physics. Paul will discuss the basic makeup of clouds, and explore some of the aspects that make them such a rich part of our daily lives.

00:04:23
Ken Murphy, creator of A History of the Sky— a time-lapse visualization that will span an entire year—talks about his project during the After Dark event, Resolution.

01:36:04
Join A, K. C. Cole, author of Something Incredibly Wonderful Happens: Frank Oppenheimer and the World He Made Up, in conversation with Exploratorium Director Dr. Dennis Bartels, eminent San Francisco Chronicle science writer David Perlman, Cinema Arts Director Liz Keim, and Exploratorium physicist Thomas Humphrey. A question-and-answer session followed the panel discussion.

00:08:00
Produced by Thorne Films, this very early 1972 film details some of the history and thought that went into the creation of the Exploratorium as told by its founding director, Frank Oppenheimer.

00:04:51
A detailed demonstration of how to do the Color Chromatography activity, which lets you see the colors hidden in black ink. Includes a discussion of materials needed.

00:01:12
An introduction to an activity that lets you discover the secret colors hidden in black ink. With a paper towel, a black marker, and a cup of water, create a rainbow of colors while exploring capillary action and chromatography.

00:01:33
Explore the science behind this activity, including capillary action (how the water moves up the paper) and chromatography, or how different elements of the ink are carried along at different rates, allowing you to see that black ink is actually made up of many different colors.

00:21:06
Dr. Laura Peticolas is a physicist at UC Berkeley's Space Physics Research group. She studies the Aurora to learn more about the Earth and the workings of our Solar System. She's currently working with NASA's Mars data to understand why the Martian aurora looks the way it does. In this podcast she discusses her research, her inspiration and how and why scientists sonify data.