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Twenty-seven miles beyond the Golden Gate, the craggy Farallon Islands have been home to fur-seal hunters from Russia, a gold-rush-era egg business, and even a nuclear waste dump. Today they’re home to 250,000 sea birds, not to mention seals, sea lions, whales, and sharks. What makes these stark-looking islands so attractive to wildlife?

This After Dark event, which explored the science behind slowing down, included artist Joe Mangrum, who created a sand mandala on the floor of the museum. In this timelapse video, shot over 8 hours, you can see the full arc of the work.

The High School Explainer Program is one of the most exciting programs at the Exploratorium. It focuses on high school--aged students in the San Francisco Bay Area and around the world.

If you sink it, they will come. That’s what Exploratorium biologist Karen Kalumuck learned when she decided to experiment by submerging PVC plates under the piers at Marina Harbor. In this program, you'll meet the bizarre aquatic life forms that inhabit our Bay.

San Francisco's meteorological landscape is as unique as its social landscape. Tune in as we investigate why our city has many microclimates.

What are you afraid of? Snakes? Spiders? Heights? This After Dark event investigated the psychology and biology of fear, and included Damian Cooksey confronting his fear by demonstrating the sport of highlining far above visitors’ heads.

The Exploratorium celebrated its future home at Piers 15 and 17 in San Francisco with an official groundbreaking ceremony and festivities on October 19, 2010.

This video includes interviews with Exploratorium Executive Director Dr. Dennis Bartels and Exploratorium Chairman of the Board George Cogan about Piers 15 and 17, as well as a fly-through animation of the future home of the Exploratorium.

This After Dark event presented a collection of objects, organizations, and activities use various alternative energy sources, and also looked at sustainably raised food.

For John Edmark, geometry is a foundation for creating beauty. Here he explains his interest in unexpected natural phenemona, and how visitors to his kaleidoscopic piece, The Geometron, can turn simple shapes into surprisingly intricate patterns of reflection.