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02:12:00
Dr. Frank Oppenheimer discussing the origins of the Exploratorium Explainer Programs.

04:20
Theater director Adam Ansell has developed a unique way of working during the 20 years that he's been running the Gray Area Ensemble in San Francisco. The doors are open to anyone who wants to participate, from experienced performers to those who have no experience in the arts. This uncommon group of ever-changing collaborators creates spellbinding, gorgeously dystopic theatrical spectacles which are both fantastical and very real. In this show, we enjoy a peek into the joyful and chaotic creation process of the "Rat Creek", The Gray Area Ensemble's latest work, which will be presented to the public at the Exit Theatre in San Francisco January 11-15th 2012.

00:09:58
Watch highlights from our live webcasts with the E/V Nautilus as she explored the Mediterranean and Black Seas searching for shipwreck, deep sea vents and the communities of organisms that live in these extreme environments.

00:01:53
The waters of San Francisco Bay are making a dramatic comeback as workers slowly remove a 1950s-era paved deck from between Piers 15 and 17 on the historic Embarcadero, at the site of the Exploratorium’s new home. In early November 2011, the east bridge, dedicated to the Fries family by San Francisco philanthropist Bill Fries, was put in place, connecting the terrace of the new Pier 15 Bay Observatory building to the adjacent side of Pier 17. When the museum opens in the spring of 2013, this bridge will offer prime views of the City and the Bay.

00:03:18
Join the Exploratorium crew on a visit to the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, where we will learn more about the ecological impact of plastic debris in the North Pacific Gyre. To learn more about marine debris visit: http://www.exploratorium.edu/tv/index.php?project=110&program=1301&type=clip

00:01:33
Weather plays a large role in sailing! Join us as we pay a visit to the National Weather Service station in San Diego to catch a glimpse into the future weather patterns that will effect the America's Cup Races.

04:17
How do the America's Cup boats sail on just one hull? Why do they sometimes capsize? Exploratorium Senior Scientist Paul Doherty dives deeper into the physics of the America's Cup catamarans in "Sailing 102: Tip Don't Flip!"

04:55
There are green sea turtles in San Diego Bay? Where did they come from? Do they really live over 100 years? Why is it important for scientists to keep track of these giant creatures, and how on earth do they do it? In this interview with ecologist Tomoharu Eguchi (NOAA Marine Fisheries Service) and ecology graduate student Sheila Madrak, we meet the sea turtles and explore these 'big' questions.

02:50
The Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System (http://sccoos.org/) gathers live data about winds, waves, surface currents, temperature, and water quality, and makes it available to everyone. In this piece, Oceanographer Art Miller tells us about this system, and about how America's Cup sailors can use this kind of data and modeling to improve their race performances. To access wind modeling data, visit: http://www.sccoos.org/data/observations/

00:01:51
Pouring concrete is an ongoing feature of construction at the Piers. This footage, captured in July 2011, shows the well-choreographed process involved, from pumping the concrete into rebar-latticed slabs via remote-controlled overhead boom, to vibrating the concrete to get rid of air pockets, to flattening the surface using 2x4s (“screed”) and rakes (“come-along tools”), to tamping in (“jitterbugging”) bits of sand and gravel, to the final smoothing and leveling of the finished surface. This pour created an extension to the southeast apron of Pier 15, adjacent to what will become the East Gallery.