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Whether you want to call it a “Blood Moon”, “Harvest Moon” or a “Supermoon” ...the rare total Lunar Eclipse happening on September 27th hasn't happened in 32 years, and won't happen again for another 18 years. If you are on the west coast the eclipse will begin at 7:11 p.m. PDT Sunday evening and will last one hour and 12 minutes.

The drinking water provided for San Francisco and many nearby communities is among the purest in the world. Located high in the Sierras, more than 200 miles away, Hetch Hetchy reservoir holds most of this water which is fed by springtime snowmelt via the Tuolumne River. The system for delivering that water is almost entirely gravity fed, requiring almost no fossil fuel consumption to move water from the mountains to the tap. Take an exclusive tour with the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) as they lead us through this unique system and address the current drought and how to conserve water.

On February 26, 1998, a total solar eclipse darkened skies in a swath stretching from the Pacific Ocean to the Atlantic, across the Caribbean. From the island of Aruba, an Exploratorium team presented a live Webcast of this celestial event. At the time, Webcasting technology was in its infancy, and this first live Webcast ever of a solar eclipse broke existing records for the number of viewers. Watch the archived Webcast here, or just click on the images below for still photos of eclipse highlights.

Join Exploratorium scientists Paul Doherty and Isabel Hawkins for a live webcast as they share information about the Rosetta Mission, which is due to be "woken up" on January 20th, 2014. Rosetta is a spacecraft en route to Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, where it will make the most detailed study of a comet ever attempted.

Watch the beginning of Venus’s transit across the disk of the sun, one of the rarest astronomical events.

Watch the conclusion of Venus’s 6.5-hour journey across the disk of the sun, one of the rarest astronomical events.

Senior Exploratorium Scientist, Paul Doherty demonstrates how you can make your own sun viewer. You can safely view sunspots, eclipses and transits with this equipment that you may have laying around the house! To learn more about the upcoming Transit of Venus visit: http://www.exploratorium.edu/venus/question3.html

This After Dark event presented a collection of objects, organizations, and activities use various alternative energy sources, and also looked at sustainably raised food.

Astronomer Dr. Isabel Hawkins's journey to the stars began with two chance moments of enchantment with celestial bodies in her native Argentina. Inspired by the mystery of the sky, she went on to study physics and astronomy in California and then to work for 20 years as a research astronomer at UC Berkeley. Now retired from research and devoted to inciting a love of the stars and sky in young people, Dr. Hawkins reflects on her own initial moments of inspiration, on sharing her love of stars with others, and on how astronomy can, and should, remind us of our connection to one another, under a canopy of mystery.

Students really struggle with the metric system. TI staff educator Lori Lambertson tells us how she helps students get a handle on what the units really mean.