Exploratorium home Exploratorium home Explo.tv
Browse programs by:
Search 
04:00
The Museum of Jurassic Technology in Los Angeles, California, is an encyclopedic museum holding many splendid, unique, and puzzling treasures. It's a carnival of delights and ideas, many of them outside of the commonly held canons of fact and accomplishment. It slips around the question, 'is it real?', refusing to pit fact against fiction or art against data, instead weaving it all together into something more mysterious and joyful. In this second of two segments on the museum, curator David Wilson welcomes us into his worlds of inspiration, and parts the curtain to reveal how this impossible place indeed exists.

00:04:23
Ken Murphy, creator of A History of the Sky— a time-lapse visualization that will span an entire year—talks about his project during the After Dark event, Resolution.

00:22:45
Join Exploratorium Senior Scientist Paul Doherty and visiting scientist Alfredo Mateus for an exploration of hands-on demos. In today's webcast, Paul and Alfredo will be looking at a voice activated chemical reaction and what happens when you heat plastic in water!

1:17:34
How do opera singers sing loud enough to be heard over an orchestra? Can an opera singer's voice really break a wine glass? What's the difference between a baritone and a soprano? Discover the answers to these questions—and more!—in this presentation for families. Join physicist and composer Dr. Brian Holmes and San Francisco Opera Center Director Sheri Greenawald to explore how the art and science of singing combine in opera.

00:11:16
Our team of middle school students from the Aim High program investigates new technologies that use our unique physical traits as tools for identification. Vox Unlocks tunes into voice recognition

1:04:44
Join us for an interactive webcast that includes a visit to Museo La Specola in Florence, Italy. The museum houses a collection of exquisite life-sized wax medical models that in the late 18th century represented the cutting edge of 3-dimensional imaging technology. We'll also talk with Dr. Hugh Patterson, Chief Anatomy Professor at UCSF, about how today's medical students study anatomy, and with John Murray of 3-D Systems, about the latest developments in solid object imaging.

1:03:23
On May 13, 2000, we peeked under the wrappings of an Egyptian mummy from the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. A live video link connected us to the imaging center at UC San Francisco. Radiologist Dr. Henry Goldberg and Fine Arts museum conservator Lesley Bone guided us through the CT scan and helped to interpret the findings.

1:59:03
This episode of Sedge Thomson's West Coast Live radio variety show links up with the Exploratorium's Revealing Bodies exhibition and series of webcasts. In this webcast, author Betty Ann Kevles discusses her book "Naked to the Bone: Medical Imaging in the Twentieth Century," performance artist Scott Serrano portrays Wilson Quain, a nineteenth-century "self-dissecting" anatomist, +4db (an a capella jazz group) sings, naturalist Claire Peaslee speaks, and house pianist Gini Wilson performs.