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A little over five years after initial construction on the Exploratorium's new home at Piers 15-17 began, the installation of a 24' x 60' floating dock off the south Apron of Pier 15 took place in early November. The dock will provide Pier access for water taxis in the San Francisco Bay. Timelapse video captures the last of the Exploratorium's original project construction.

Science, history, and art converge in this whimsical tribute to San Francisco’s 1915 World’s Fair, which is celebrating its centennial this year. Lost landscapes from the Fair (including the Exploratorium’s former home, the Palace of Fine Arts) become the backdrop for spectral encounters. Are the spirits of fairgoers getting restless? Museum visitors who dared to enter the Black Box interacted with ethereal forces and became part of a world of ghostly apparitions that sprung to life. Just in time for Halloween, Visible Spectres took as its cue the illusion technique known as Pepper’s ghost, used in theaters, haunted houses, sideshows, and magic tricks. Do YOU see ghosts? Kerry Laitala is an award-winning moving-image artist who uses analog, digital, and hybrid forms to investigate the ways in which media influences culture. She considers this approach to making art as a type of media archeology. Laitala’s work resides at the crossroads of science, history, and technology. Her uncanny approach to evolving systems of belief manifests through an array of media including films, videos, installations, photographic works, performances, and kinetic sculpture. She studied photography and film at the Massachusetts College of Art and received her Master in Film from the San Francisco Art Institute. Laitala’s 2015 City Luminous series encompasses seven separate works (and counting), spanning the realms of installation, multi-projector performance, photography, and single-channel film, shown thus far at the Palace of Fine Arts, the San Francisco Art Institute, the California Historical Society, and in solo shows at Oddball Films and Shapeshifters Cinema. Elements of The City Luminous series have been funded by a Special Projects Grant from the Princess Grace Foundation, San Francisco Arts Commission Grant, Yerba Buena Benefit District grant, California Historical Society, and Maurice Kanbar.

Tune in to Resonance, a series of live performances and conversations amplifying unique frequencies of musical possibility. Season 3 begins December 10 with music from the Arab world presented by composer and performer A.J. Racy. For more information - http://www.exploratorium.edu/arts/resonance

Millions of people around the world struggle to live with corneal blindness—the loss of sight caused by damage to the surface of the eye. It's a treatable condition with a clear solution: a corneal transplant. This Science in the City episode will highlight the work SightLife is doing to help end corneal blindness by making transplants possible. The video will cover the whole process from corneal recovery from a donor to corneal transplant surgery.

Whether you want to call it a “Blood Moon”, “Harvest Moon” or a “Supermoon” ...the rare total Lunar Eclipse happening on September 27th hasn't happened in 32 years, and won't happen again for another 18 years. If you are on the west coast the eclipse will begin at 7:11 p.m. PDT Sunday evening and will last one hour and 12 minutes.

No importa como la llames: luna de sangre, luna de cosecha, o super luna, este domingo 27 de septiembre tendrás chance de ver a nuestra bella luna como nunca! Se trata de un eclipse lunar excepcional, que no ha sucedido desde hace 32 años, y no volvera a suceder por 18 años mas! “La luz roja que ilumina la Luna durante un eclipse es luz del Sol que emana de todos los atardeceres y amaneceres en la Tierra durante ese isntante!” ¡No te pierdas el Día de la ingeniería en el Exploratorium y ver el espectacular eclipse lunar!

The drinking water provided for San Francisco and many nearby communities is among the purest in the world. Located high in the Sierras, more than 200 miles away, Hetch Hetchy reservoir holds most of this water which is fed by springtime snowmelt via the Tuolumne River. The system for delivering that water is almost entirely gravity fed, requiring almost no fossil fuel consumption to move water from the mountains to the tap. Take an exclusive tour with the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) as they lead us through this unique system and address the current drought and how to conserve water.

Immerse yourself in visual storytelling that extends the possibilities of cinema. See aspects of film rarely displayed: unusual film formats with Dino Everett and an insider view into projectionists’ techniques with Paul Clipson. Enter worlds created by Elise Baldwin—investigating collective memory—and by Wet Gate, a 16mm projector–playing ensemble. Experience Thad Povey and Mark Taylor’s multiturntable record player, the realization of their near-identical dreams, and Tooth’s multiprojector dreamscape installation. Play with the Eunoics Light Club as they summon seemingly living forms using lenses, filters, and mirrors. Debate the merits of short films with Brian Darr and make your own cinematic toys and sound effects. Finally, make your exploration of film not just figurative but literal by seeking—and finding—four films shown in the museum’s out-of-the-way corners.

On February 26, 1998, a total solar eclipse darkened skies in a swath stretching from the Pacific Ocean to the Atlantic, across the Caribbean. From the island of Aruba, an Exploratorium team presented a live Webcast of this celestial event. At the time, Webcasting technology was in its infancy, and this first live Webcast ever of a solar eclipse broke existing records for the number of viewers. Watch the archived Webcast here, or just click on the images below for still photos of eclipse highlights.

A dozen whales, different species and ages, have washed up recently on nearly 300 miles of Northern California coastline. While this is not a record, it's still alarming. Why is it happening? Bay Area scientists are considering factors such as environmental changes, food distribution, shipping, ocean currents, and predator behavior. Meet staff from the California Academy of Sciences, Mission Science Workshop, and the Exploratorium, and explore evidence leading to and hypotheses about these tragic events.