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00:03:16
Dr. John Barnes, Station Manager of NOAA's Mauna Loa Observatory, shares the history of Charles Keeling's pioneering carbon dioxide measurements, which have been taken continually at Mauna Loa since 1958.

00:03:50
You've probably heard about the Texas-sized island of plastic trash swirling in the center of the Pacific Ocean. But did you know we have our own pockets of floating trash right here in San Francisco Bay? Join us on a trash safari with Sealife Convervation—a research and education group studying the volume, distribution, and sources of trash in the San Francisco and Monterey Bays.

00:03:50
A mouse's eye view of the main floor of the Exploratorium. Filmed at the Palace of Fine Arts location in January 2010.

00:04:08
TI staff educator Eric Muller shows me how to carbonate my tongue. Blech!

00:10:47
We tour the NOAA Atmospheric Research Observatory at the South Pole where scientists are monitoring carbon dioxide levels, CFCs, solar radiation, and the ozone hole.

00:32:06
Brendan Kelly learned from Inuit hunters how to train Labrador retrievers to find ringed seals. This allows Brendan and his colleagues to set up live-capture nets to keep the seals from diving after they come up for air. The seals are tagged with satellite transponders so they can be tracked to learn about their breeding grounds and migration habits.

00:16:25
Join Exploratorium staff as they give the quick answers to the most frequently asked questions about global warming: What is a "tipping point"? What are carbon credits? What is carbon neutral? What can I do? What can my kid do?

00:09:55
More quick answers to the most frequently asked questions about global warming.

00:55:27
Watch as Exploratorium staff and local teachers compete for the title of Iron Science Teacher. Each contestant has 10 minutes to make a science lesson out of a secret ingredient. In this special Halloween edition, today's secret ingredient is: Plastic Bags!

00:52:14
Learn how sparkling wine is made, what makes it different from still wine, and where all those little bubbles come from! We reveal how to open a bottle without touching the cork, as well as the best way to keep the bubbles in the bubbly. Join our special guests, Stanford chemistry professor Dick Zare, and French enologist Michel Salgues, winemaker at Roederer Estates in California, as we explore the science of tiny bubbles.