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00:31:00
Join host Sarah Cahill as she interviews innovator, musician, and composer Roscoe Mitchell. Program 2 of the Resonance series at the Exploratorium.

00:07:10
Seasonal cycles and winter storms bring extra-high "king tides" that can swamp coastal structures and habitats. What’s a coastal dweller to do? Take pictures! It’s no joke: Educators from the California King Tides Initiative explain how citizen snapshots can be of real value to researchers and policy makers.

00:26:22
Exploratorium film by Lynn Rosen and Steve Giordano for KVOS-TV, Bellingham, Washington, 1974

00:28:00
In this historical video from 1996, which was originally made for a museum floor installation, we learn about both the Palace of Fine Arts and the roots of the Exploratorium. This piece mixes footage from films in the Exploratorium's collection and interviews with historians, architects, and museum staff.

00:08:22
In 1997, the Exploratorium opened the Phyllis C. Wattis Webcast Studio on the museum floor, linking Internet users to live museum events and to live events at remote locations. In this video you can explore the early days of webcasting at the Exploratorium.

00:03:15
Join Dr. Russell Schnell, the director of the Global Monitoring Division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), as he talks about what it takes to monitor climate change.

00:03:16
Dr. John Barnes, Station Manager of NOAA's Mauna Loa Observatory, shares the history of Charles Keeling's pioneering carbon dioxide measurements, which have been taken continually at Mauna Loa since 1958.

00:02:25
Originally produced for NOVA in 1982, Jon Else's film, "Palace of Delights" takes a look behind the scenes at the Exploratorium in action.

02:12:00
Dr. Frank Oppenheimer discussing the origins of the Exploratorium Explainer Programs.

Like the Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco's cable cars are world-renowned as emblems of our city. Join us for a ride down Hyde Street as we investigate what makes these historic cars go—and more importantly, stop—on the steep hills of San Francisco. To learn more visit the Cable Car Museum website: http://www.cablecarmuseum.org/index.html