Exploratorium home Exploratorium home Explo.tv
Browse programs by:
The drinking water provided for San Francisco and many nearby communities is among the purest in the world. Located high in the Sierras, more than 200 miles away, Hetch Hetchy reservoir holds most of this water which is fed by springtime snowmelt via the Tuolumne River. The system for delivering that water is almost entirely gravity fed, requiring almost no fossil fuel consumption to move water from the mountains to the tap. Take an exclusive tour with the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) as they lead us through this unique system and address the current drought and how to conserve water.

This short documentary chronicles the people, places, things, and ideas at the core of The Windows, a four-day trek from the back deck of the Exploratorium to the top of Mount Diablo. Led by artist Harrell Fletcher and the Exploratorium's Center for Art & Inquiry in the summer of 2013, the walk involved a dozen hikers and dozens more participants and learning experiences en route to the summit. http://www.exploratorium.edu/arts/the-windows

Watch the Exploratorium's construction process from December 2010 to November 2012 in under two minutes. Come see for yourself—doors open at Pier 15 on April 17, 2013. http://press.exploratorium.edu/exploratoriums-net-zero-energy-goal-for-new-waterfront-home-2013/ Images courtesy of Ken Murphy. Music by Wayne Grim.

Tardigrades are amazing creatures that can withstand the most extreme conditions on Earth, as well as the vacuum of space! This unique and charismatic animal has the ability to survive in a variety of situations. In today's program, Exploratorium scientist Karen Kalumuck will continue our programming about life in extreme environments as it relates to the search for 'habitability' on Mars.

Why is water, or evidence of water, so important to the Mars missions? Join Exploratorium scientists Ron Hipschman and Karen Kalumuck as they examine water as one of the building blocks for life and what previous Mars missions have discovered about water on the red planet.

The Exploratorium is more than a science museum. It is the global leader in informal learning, having spawned 1000 participatory science centers around the world. An estimated 180 million people play with our creations in museums around the globe and online. The Exploratorium is made up of scientists, artists, teachers and tinkerers. It is a public laboratory where visitors are encouraged to ask questions, experiment, and ultimately see the world a little differently.

Take a look at the construction at Piers 15 and 17 from a different vantage point. This past August we recorded video of the Exploratorium's new home from a boat about 100 yards off the back of the piers.

We went and talked with the folks who ran the Microzoo camp at Burning Man 2010, and learned about critters in extreme environments.

Would you drink from a water fountain fashioned from an actual (but unused!) toilet? Watch museum visitors experience the tension between reason and emotion while playing with this unusual Mind area exhibit, aptly named "Sip of Conflict."

Join exhibit developer Charles Sowers as he demonstrates Watch Water Freeze, an exhibit designed to encourage noticing. Patience with this piece is rewarded with breathtaking patterns of ice crystals. Viewed through a polarizing filter, the beautiful colors and crystalline structures of Watch Water Freeze have inspired countless museum visitors to reach for their cameras.