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Whether you want to call it a “Blood Moon”, “Harvest Moon” or a “Supermoon” ...the rare total Lunar Eclipse happening on September 27th hasn't happened in 32 years, and won't happen again for another 18 years. If you are on the west coast the eclipse will begin at 7:11 p.m. PDT Sunday evening and will last one hour and 12 minutes.

No importa como la llames: luna de sangre, luna de cosecha, o super luna, este domingo 27 de septiembre tendrás chance de ver a nuestra bella luna como nunca! Se trata de un eclipse lunar excepcional, que no ha sucedido desde hace 32 años, y no volvera a suceder por 18 años mas! “La luz roja que ilumina la Luna durante un eclipse es luz del Sol que emana de todos los atardeceres y amaneceres en la Tierra durante ese isntante!” ¡No te pierdas el Día de la ingeniería en el Exploratorium y ver el espectacular eclipse lunar!

Find your rhythm. Come play at the Exploratorium! Now open at Pier 15 in San Francisco.

An introduction to a spinning disc called a stroboscope, which lets you create your own animated cartoon.

A detailed demonstration of how to make a stroboscope, including a discussion of materials needed.

The science behind the Whirling Watcher stroboscope, including a discussion of the phenomenon called persistence of vision, which in this activity creates the illusion of a galloping horse.

How does your eye work? You see the world because light gets into your eyes. Your eye uses that light to make an image of the world inside your eye—just as a camera uses light to make a photograph. At the Exploratorium, we dissect cow eyes to show people how an eye functions, and look at the parts that make up an eye. This video shows and explains a dissection with one of our staff Explainers.

Join the Exploratorium's Dr. Paul Doherty as he visits a "sculpture to observe the stars" in northern New Mexico, where the Sangre de Cristo Mountains meet the eastern plains. There artist Charles Ross is creating an art installation that is also a star observatory. This major earthwork has two main elements: the Star Tunnel, which allows you to walk through the entire history of the earth's changing alignment to our North Star, Polaris; and the Solar Pyramid, where one can visually experience an hour of the earth's rotation.

Our team of middle school students from the Aim High program investigates new technologies that use our unique physical traits as tools for identification. Eye-D explores the possibilities of retinal scans.

In a broad-ranging look at the impact of Eames design on contemporary culture, Steve Cabella hosts a discussion with Joseph Rosa, Curator of Architecture and Design at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.